Ochsenstein Castle

Ochsenstein Castle, locally known as Château d'Ochsenstein, lies on mountain west of the village of Reinhardsmunster, in the Bas-Rhin department in France.

Ochsenstein Castle is actually a so-called 'castle group' of 3 castles. The south castle was called Grand-Ochsenstein, this one presents the largest and most interesting remains. The middle one was called Wasselnheim/Wachelheim and the north castle was called Petit-Ochsenstein. Wasselnheim has almost completely disappeared and Petit-Ochsenstein presents only a few remnants. The 3 castles were built on and between 3 sandstone spurs, almost directly next to each other.

Ochsenstein Castle was probably built in the late 12th century. It was called Ochsenstein after the family that served as castellans for the Geroldseck family to whom they were probably related. In 1217, Othon d'Ochsenstein divided up the castle between his sons.

Wasselnheim or Petit-Ochsenstein (sources are not sure) was severely damaged following a siege in 1284. Although rebuilt it was again besieged in 1382. By 1403 it was apparently rebuilt.

When in 1485 the Ochsensteins died out Ochsenstein Castle was inherited by the Counts of Deux-Ponts-Bitche. Following financial troubles they mortgaged it out and by 1527 it was described as being dilapidated. In 1555 they redeemed the mortgage and started to rebuilt Grand-Ochsenstein Castle in 1559 but a fire destroyed it the following year. It was never rebuilt and during the 18th century it was used as a quarry.

At present Ochsenstein Castle can freely be visited. A nice castle group. It takes a walk of only 15 minutes over a climbing forest path from the nearest parking space.


Gallery

Grand-Ochsenstein

Petit-Ochsenstein

Ochsenstein Castle

Ochsenstein Castle, locally known as Château d'Ochsenstein, lies on mountain west of the village of Reinhardsmunster, in the Bas-Rhin department in France.

Ochsenstein Castle is actually a so-called 'castle group' of 3 castles. The south castle was called Grand-Ochsenstein, this one presents the largest and most interesting remains. The middle one was called Wasselnheim/Wachelheim and the north castle was called Petit-Ochsenstein. Wasselnheim has almost completely disappeared and Petit-Ochsenstein presents only a few remnants. The 3 castles were built on and between 3 sandstone spurs, almost directly next to each other.

Ochsenstein Castle was probably built in the late 12th century. It was called Ochsenstein after the family that served as castellans for the Geroldseck family to whom they were probably related. In 1217, Othon d'Ochsenstein divided up the castle between his sons.

Wasselnheim or Petit-Ochsenstein (sources are not sure) was severely damaged following a siege in 1284. Although rebuilt it was again besieged in 1382. By 1403 it was apparently rebuilt.

When in 1485 the Ochsensteins died out Ochsenstein Castle was inherited by the Counts of Deux-Ponts-Bitche. Following financial troubles they mortgaged it out and by 1527 it was described as being dilapidated. In 1555 they redeemed the mortgage and started to rebuilt Grand-Ochsenstein Castle in 1559 but a fire destroyed it the following year. It was never rebuilt and during the 18th century it was used as a quarry.

At present Ochsenstein Castle can freely be visited. A nice castle group. It takes a walk of only 15 minutes over a climbing forest path from the nearest parking space.


Gallery

Grand-Ochsenstein

Petit-Ochsenstein