Faing Castle

Château du Faing

Faing Castle, locally known as Château du Faing, lies in the village of Jamoigne, in the province of Luxembourg in the Wallonia region in Belgium.

The first fortification at this site was a castle built during the 12th century. In the 14th century another castle was built. The family who owned it would become known as the Faing family in the 15th century.

In 1452, Hugues, Lord of Faing and Breu, was appointed general by Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy. Hugues fought for the Duke in the Battle of Montbéliard in 1473. In 1478 he fought for the Holy Roman Emperor, Maximilian I, against William I de La Marck, the Wild Boar of the Ardennes. Hugues died in 1480 as Governor of Luxembourg.

It is said that Henri du Faing, the eldest son of Hugues, entertained Nostradamus, the famous French astrologer, in Faing Castle in 1539. Gilles du Faing, a diplomat in the service of Philip II of Spain and both the Archduke of Austria, Albert VII and his wife Isabella Clara Eugenia, owned the castle in the first quarter of the 17th century. The House of Faing held the castle until 1709 when they died out.

During the next two centuries the castle fell into dilapidation. Its state was so bad that it was completely rebuilt according to its former appearance by the architect Pierre Van Kerkhoven for Count Fernand de Loen d’Enschedé between 1872 and 1880.

The castle was acquired by the congregation The Sisters of Mercy from Besançon in 1903. In the beginning of WW I they nursed hundreds of wounded soldiers, notably from the Battle of Rossignol. During WW II the castle was used as a home for children of imprisoned Belgian soldiers. 87 Jewish children where saved from deportation by being registered under fake identities as non-Jewish and housed here.

At present Faing Castle houses the municipial administration of Chiny; the municipality of which Jamoigne is now a part. Its exterior can freely be visited. A nice castle.


Gallery

Faing Castle

Château du Faing

Faing Castle, locally known as Château du Faing, lies in the village of Jamoigne, in the province of Luxembourg in the Wallonia region in Belgium.

The first fortification at this site was a castle built during the 12th century. In the 14th century another castle was built. The family who owned it would become known as the Faing family in the 15th century.

In 1452, Hugues, Lord of Faing and Breu, was appointed general by Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy. Hugues fought for the Duke in the Battle of Montbéliard in 1473. In 1478 he fought for the Holy Roman Emperor, Maximilian I, against William I de La Marck, the Wild Boar of the Ardennes. Hugues died in 1480 as Governor of Luxembourg.

It is said that Henri du Faing, the eldest son of Hugues, entertained Nostradamus, the famous French astrologer, in Faing Castle in 1539. Gilles du Faing, a diplomat in the service of Philip II of Spain and both the Archduke of Austria, Albert VII and his wife Isabella Clara Eugenia, owned the castle in the first quarter of the 17th century. The House of Faing held the castle until 1709 when they died out.

During the next two centuries the castle fell into dilapidation. Its state was so bad that it was completely rebuilt according to its former appearance by the architect Pierre Van Kerkhoven for Count Fernand de Loen d’Enschedé between 1872 and 1880.

The castle was acquired by the congregation The Sisters of Mercy from Besançon in 1903. In the beginning of WW I they nursed hundreds of wounded soldiers, notably from the Battle of Rossignol. During WW II the castle was used as a home for children of imprisoned Belgian soldiers. 87 Jewish children where saved from deportation by being registered under fake identities as non-Jewish and housed here.

At present Faing Castle houses the municipial administration of Chiny; the municipality of which Jamoigne is now a part. Its exterior can freely be visited. A nice castle.


Gallery