Lœwenstein Castle

Lœwenstein Castle, locally known as Château du Lœwenstein, lies in the woods north-west of the town of Wingen, in the Bas-Rhin department in France. It is situated just some 500 m from the border with Germany.This area is also known as the Northern Alsace or the Northern Vosges.

Lœwenstein Castle was first mentioned in 1283 when it was given as a fief to Otto of Ochsenstein by Rudolf I of Germany. It was probably built earlier that century as a siege castle to Hohenbourg Castle, only some 200 m north of it. It was owned by the Lords of Fleckenstein. It was taken from them in 1276 by Rudolf.

In 1386 the castle had become a den of robber knights which caused it to be destroyed during a punitive expedition by the Bishop of Strasbourg Jean de Lichtenberg. By that time it was also known as Linkenschmied (Left-handed blacksmith) Castle after the practice of one of the robber knights to shoe his horses in reverse to confuse his pursuers. The ruined castle was later repaired by the Puller family of Hohenbourg Castle and used as an advanced post.

In 1457 it was destroyed by Frederick I, Count Palatine of Simmern, over a conflict he had with de Puller family. It was described as being irreparable in 1473. What was left of the castle was finally destroyed in 1676/1677 by French troops led by the cavalry general Joseph de Montclar.

Lœwenstein Castle was built on a narrow rocky sandstone spur. Almost nothing of the castle remains but some architectural elements carved out of the rock.

At present the castle is freely accessible. Not a very interesting ruin but nice for a detour if you are going to visit Hohenbourg Castle. Fleckenstein and Wegelnburg castles are also nearby.


Gallery

Lœwenstein Castle

Lœwenstein Castle, locally known as Château du Lœwenstein, lies in the woods north-west of the town of Wingen, in the Bas-Rhin department in France. It is situated just some 500 m from the border with Germany.This area is also known as the Northern Alsace or the Northern Vosges.

Lœwenstein Castle was first mentioned in 1283 when it was given as a fief to Otto of Ochsenstein by Rudolf I of Germany. It was probably built earlier that century as a siege castle to Hohenbourg Castle, only some 200 m north of it. It was owned by the Lords of Fleckenstein. It was taken from them in 1276 by Rudolf.

In 1386 the castle had become a den of robber knights which caused it to be destroyed during a punitive expedition by the Bishop of Strasbourg Jean de Lichtenberg. By that time it was also known as Linkenschmied (Left-handed blacksmith) Castle after the practice of one of the robber knights to shoe his horses in reverse to confuse his pursuers. The ruined castle was later repaired by the Puller family of Hohenbourg Castle and used as an advanced post.

In 1457 it was destroyed by Frederick I, Count Palatine of Simmern, over a conflict he had with de Puller family. It was described as being irreparable in 1473. What was left of the castle was finally destroyed in 1676/1677 by French troops led by the cavalry general Joseph de Montclar.

Lœwenstein Castle was built on a narrow rocky sandstone spur. Almost nothing of the castle remains but some architectural elements carved out of the rock.

At present the castle is freely accessible. Not a very interesting ruin but nice for a detour if you are going to visit Hohenbourg Castle. Fleckenstein and Wegelnburg castles are also nearby.


Gallery