Longueville Castle

Longueville Castle, locally known as Château de Longueville or Château Gauthier Giffard, lies in the village of Longueville-sur-Scie, in the Seine-Maritime department in France.

The first fortification at this site was a Roman castrum. The first, Carolingian, wooden castle dates back to the 9th century. Towards the end of the 11th century the stone Longueville Castle was built by Walter Giffard (Gauthier II Giffard in French), 1st Earl of Buckingham, to replace the wooden predecessor. This coincided with the creation of the County of Longueville of which the castle became the seat.

Later the County of Longueville was owned by several nobles. In the 14th century it belonged to the Counts of Evreux, a title which was also held by several Spanish Kings in that time. This led to the castle being besieged in 1356. By 1364 Longueville Castle was French property again and offered, by Charles V of France, to Bertrand du Guesclin, a Breton knight who would later become Constable of France.

In the 15th century Longueville Castle changed hands between the English and French several times, with both parties carrying out works on the castle. Finally it became French territory.

In 1505 the County of Longueville was elevated to a duchy. In 1589 the castle was visited by Henry IV of France. During the 17th century the last Duke of Longueville died and the duchy was discontinued. The castle became managed by a bailiff. After that the castle was dismantled and turned into a stone quarry. Following that the castle fell to ruin.

At present the ruin of Longueville Castle can freely be visited. A nice ruin although not very spectacular.


Gallery

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Longueville Castle

Longueville Castle, locally known as Château de Longueville or Château Gauthier Giffard, lies in the village of Longueville-sur-Scie, in the Seine-Maritime department in France.

The first fortification at this site was a Roman castrum. The first, Carolingian, wooden castle dates back to the 9th century. Towards the end of the 11th century the stone Longueville Castle was built by Walter Giffard (Gauthier II Giffard in French), 1st Earl of Buckingham, to replace the wooden predecessor. This coincided with the creation of the County of Longueville of which the castle became the seat.

Later the County of Longueville was owned by several nobles. In the 14th century it belonged to the Counts of Evreux, a title which was also held by several Spanish Kings in that time. This led to the castle being besieged in 1356. By 1364 Longueville Castle was French property again and offered, by Charles V of France, to Bertrand du Guesclin, a Breton knight who would later become Constable of France.

In the 15th century Longueville Castle changed hands between the English and French several times, with both parties carrying out works on the castle. Finally it became French territory.

In 1505 the County of Longueville was elevated to a duchy. In 1589 the castle was visited by Henry IV of France. During the 17th century the last Duke of Longueville died and the duchy was discontinued. The castle became managed by a bailiff. After that the castle was dismantled and turned into a stone quarry. Following that the castle fell to ruin.

At present the ruin of Longueville Castle can freely be visited. A nice ruin although not very spectacular.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://castles.nl/longueville-castle#sigFreeId2fe7b56c53