Thanvillé Castle

Thanvillé Castle, locally known as Château de Thanvillé, lies next to the village of the same name, in the Bas-Rhin department in France. This area is also known as the Northern Alsace or the Middle Vosges.

Construction of Thanvillé Castle started in 1084 by Hugues VII, Count of Éguisheim and Dabo, on lands belonging to the Moyenmoutier Abbey. They built a strong fortified castle which served to guard the entrance to the valley and act as a trading post due to its strategic position near a salt road. After Hugues was assassinated by the bishop of Strasbourg in 1089, the Hattstatt family took over possession of the castle. After that the castle disappears from historical records for more than 4 centuries.

Apparently the castle had been reduced to a ruin due to several wars by 1507. Then, its owner Jean de Hattstatt, started rebuilding it into a residence again. In 1540, it was Jean de Vidrange, advisor to Duke Antoine de Lorraine, who was entrusted with the castle. In 1571 the castle was again destroyed, this time by a fire which also ravaged the village, after which it was again restored.

In 1633, during the Thirty Years' War, Thanvillé Castle was again burned down, after it had been looted by Swedish troops. Reconstruction started again in 1663 by François-Anne de Bazin de Chanlas. In 1680 he had to cede the castle to his 5 sons. They sold it in 1688.

Its new owner became Marie-Agnès de Cocqfontaine. She and her descendants turned the castle into a pleasant residence. A descendant sold it in 1786 to the Dartein family. In 1810 it passed to the Castex family through marriage. They beautified the castle but it was sacked around 1870 by German troops. The Castex' restore the castle but in 1918 history repeats itself and it is again sacked by German troops. Yet again the Castex' restore their castle. In 1982 they finally sold it to the Wagner family who owns it till this day.

At present Thanvillé Castle is private property and is rented out as a venue for marriages and receptions. A nice castle, sadly enough it can not be visited.


Gallery

Thanvillé Castle

Thanvillé Castle, locally known as Château de Thanvillé, lies next to the village of the same name, in the Bas-Rhin department in France. This area is also known as the Northern Alsace or the Middle Vosges.

Construction of Thanvillé Castle started in 1084 by Hugues VII, Count of Éguisheim and Dabo, on lands belonging to the Moyenmoutier Abbey. They built a strong fortified castle which served to guard the entrance to the valley and act as a trading post due to its strategic position near a salt road. After Hugues was assassinated by the bishop of Strasbourg in 1089, the Hattstatt family took over possession of the castle. After that the castle disappears from historical records for more than 4 centuries.

Apparently the castle had been reduced to a ruin due to several wars by 1507. Then, its owner Jean de Hattstatt, started rebuilding it into a residence again. In 1540, it was Jean de Vidrange, advisor to Duke Antoine de Lorraine, who was entrusted with the castle. In 1571 the castle was again destroyed, this time by a fire which also ravaged the village, after which it was again restored.

In 1633, during the Thirty Years' War, Thanvillé Castle was again burned down, after it had been looted by Swedish troops. Reconstruction started again in 1663 by François-Anne de Bazin de Chanlas. In 1680 he had to cede the castle to his 5 sons. They sold it in 1688.

Its new owner became Marie-Agnès de Cocqfontaine. She and her descendants turned the castle into a pleasant residence. A descendant sold it in 1786 to the Dartein family. In 1810 it passed to the Castex family through marriage. They beautified the castle but it was sacked around 1870 by German troops. The Castex' restore the castle but in 1918 history repeats itself and it is again sacked by German troops. Yet again the Castex' restore their castle. In 1982 they finally sold it to the Wagner family who owns it till this day.

At present Thanvillé Castle is private property and is rented out as a venue for marriages and receptions. A nice castle, sadly enough it can not be visited.


Gallery