Rameyen Castle

Hof van Rameyen

Rameyen Castle, locally known as Hof van Rameyen, lies east of the village of Berlaar, in the province of Antwerp in the Flemish region in Belgium.

It is thought that the first fortification at this site, in the valley of the Grote Nete river, was a Roman castrum.

Probably during the 13th century a moated keep was built here. It was first mentioned in 1303 as the property of Jan II Berthout of Berlaer. That keep was 10 m high and had 2 m thick walls.  Until the 16th century the castle expanded until it had gotten its present appearance with an irregular, rectangular ground plan and a separate moated bailey entered through a gate building. In the 16th century the castle was also provided with gun ports.

The castle was owned by the Van Immerseele and De Cock families. In 1643, Boudewijn de Cock sold Rameyen, which by then had fallen into dilapidation, to Nicolaas Rubens, son of the famous Flemish painter Peter Paul Rubens, who restored it. His descendants owned the castle until 1759.

In the 19th century Rameyen Castle stood empty and had fallen into decay. Then it was acquired by again a member of the De Cock family; Esquire Nicolaas Joseph Alphonse de Cock. He then completely restored the castle and enlarged the estate with new acquisitions. After the castle was damaged during WW I it was again restored.

In 1995 Rameyen was bought by one of the wealthiest Dutch industrials; Joseph de Gruyter and his wife. Although the castle was livable, it was in dire need of modernization. So, between 1996 and 2001 the entire complex was meticulously restored by the renowned antique-dealer and interior designer Axel Vervoordt, who himself owns Gravenwezel Castle and the architect R. Steenmeijer. After the castle was restored for 12 million euros, the De Gruyter family used it as their getaway-house for 1 day per year...

In 2015, the De Gruyter's sold the castle for an asking price of 17.5 million euros to Leo van Gansewinkel, another one of the wealthy Dutch industrials. After his purchase Van Gansewinkel resided in Rameyen for a couple of days per year. He died in 2019 and his family put the castle up for sale the next year. So at the moment it is for sale! The price has not been disclosed but I guess it's a bit much... Take a look here for more pictures and a small clip: Luxe Vastgoed.

At present Rameyen Castle is private property and can thus not be visited. A beautiful little castle.


Gallery

Rameyen Castle

Hof van Rameyen

Rameyen Castle, locally known as Hof van Rameyen, lies east of the village of Berlaar, in the province of Antwerp in the Flemish region in Belgium.

It is thought that the first fortification at this site, in the valley of the Grote Nete river, was a Roman castrum.

Probably during the 13th century a moated keep was built here. It was first mentioned in 1303 as the property of Jan II Berthout of Berlaer. That keep was 10 m high and had 2 m thick walls.  Until the 16th century the castle expanded until it had gotten its present appearance with an irregular, rectangular ground plan and a separate moated bailey entered through a gate building. In the 16th century the castle was also provided with gun ports.

The castle was owned by the Van Immerseele and De Cock families. In 1643, Boudewijn de Cock sold Rameyen, which by then had fallen into dilapidation, to Nicolaas Rubens, son of the famous Flemish painter Peter Paul Rubens, who restored it. His descendants owned the castle until 1759.

In the 19th century Rameyen Castle stood empty and had fallen into decay. Then it was acquired by again a member of the De Cock family; Esquire Nicolaas Joseph Alphonse de Cock. He then completely restored the castle and enlarged the estate with new acquisitions. After the castle was damaged during WW I it was again restored.

In 1995 Rameyen was bought by one of the wealthiest Dutch industrials; Joseph de Gruyter and his wife. Although the castle was livable, it was in dire need of modernization. So, between 1996 and 2001 the entire complex was meticulously restored by the renowned antique-dealer and interior designer Axel Vervoordt, who himself owns Gravenwezel Castle and the architect R. Steenmeijer. After the castle was restored for 12 million euros, the De Gruyter family used it as their getaway-house for 1 day per year...

In 2015, the De Gruyter's sold the castle for an asking price of 17.5 million euros to Leo van Gansewinkel, another one of the wealthy Dutch industrials. After his purchase Van Gansewinkel resided in Rameyen for a couple of days per year. He died in 2019 and his family put the castle up for sale the next year. So at the moment it is for sale! The price has not been disclosed but I guess it's a bit much... Take a look here for more pictures and a small clip: Luxe Vastgoed.

At present Rameyen Castle is private property and can thus not be visited. A beautiful little castle.


Gallery