Kintzheim Castle

Kintzheim Castle, locally known as Château de Kintzheim, lies on a hill above to the village of the same name, in the Bas-Rhin department in France. This area is also known as the Southern Alsace or the Southern Vosges.

Construction of Kintzheim Castle started around 1250 by Frederick II of Hohenstaufen, the Holy Roman Emperor. The site had already been used for a temporary residence since the 6th century by Merovingian and later Carolingian royals. The keep and its rampart were finished at the end of the 13th century. The residential wings were added during the 14th and 15th century.

In 1492 the castle was sold to the town of Sélestat.

In 1633, during the Thirty Years' War, Kintzheim Castle was destroyed by Swedish troops. After the war had ended, in 1648, the town of Sélestat sold the damaged castle to their former mayor; J.G. de Gollen. He then restored it but never actually went to live in it. Later it passed to the Marquis de Broc through inheritance.

Between 1760 and 1780 the castle's last inhabitant was a hermit who maintained the chapel. After the French Revolution in 1789 the castle was finally abandoned.

In 1801 the Marquis de Broc tried to sell the empty castle. The town of Sélestat tried to buy it but the castle was granted to Philippe-Gaétan, Baron Mathieu de Faviers, by Napoleon Bonaparte. The baron didn't restore the castle but had a new manor built beneath it. The castle was probably just used as a romantic backdrop and in 1830 its roofs disappeared. Later that century the romantic movement brought medieval castles back in style and thus, in 1876, the ruin of Kintzheim Castle was consolidated.

During WW II, in 1945, the castle was used as an observation post which caused the keep to being hit by artillery shells. Since 1968 the castle has been turned into a bird park about predatory birds; La Volerie des Aigles.

At present Kintzheim Castle can be visited for a fee as a visitor to the bird park, which can be quite overrun with tourists. It is mainly used as a nice backdrop for the bird shows and a cafetaria. Too bad the keep is inaccessible but the castle is still worth a visit.


Gallery

Kintzheim Castle

Kintzheim Castle, locally known as Château de Kintzheim, lies on a hill above to the village of the same name, in the Bas-Rhin department in France. This area is also known as the Southern Alsace or the Southern Vosges.

Construction of Kintzheim Castle started around 1250 by Frederick II of Hohenstaufen, the Holy Roman Emperor. The site had already been used for a temporary residence since the 6th century by Merovingian and later Carolingian royals. The keep and its rampart were finished at the end of the 13th century. The residential wings were added during the 14th and 15th century.

In 1492 the castle was sold to the town of Sélestat.

In 1633, during the Thirty Years' War, Kintzheim Castle was destroyed by Swedish troops. After the war had ended, in 1648, the town of Sélestat sold the damaged castle to their former mayor; J.G. de Gollen. He then restored it but never actually went to live in it. Later it passed to the Marquis de Broc through inheritance.

Between 1760 and 1780 the castle's last inhabitant was a hermit who maintained the chapel. After the French Revolution in 1789 the castle was finally abandoned.

In 1801 the Marquis de Broc tried to sell the empty castle. The town of Sélestat tried to buy it but the castle was granted to Philippe-Gaétan, Baron Mathieu de Faviers, by Napoleon Bonaparte. The baron didn't restore the castle but had a new manor built beneath it. The castle was probably just used as a romantic backdrop and in 1830 its roofs disappeared. Later that century the romantic movement brought medieval castles back in style and thus, in 1876, the ruin of Kintzheim Castle was consolidated.

During WW II, in 1945, the castle was used as an observation post which caused the keep to being hit by artillery shells. Since 1968 the castle has been turned into a bird park about predatory birds; La Volerie des Aigles.

At present Kintzheim Castle can be visited for a fee as a visitor to the bird park, which can be quite overrun with tourists. It is mainly used as a nice backdrop for the bird shows and a cafetaria. Too bad the keep is inaccessible but the castle is still worth a visit.


Gallery