Fort Moerschans

Fort Moerschans

Fort Moerschans lies north east of the fortified town of Hulst, in the province of Zeeland in the Netherlands.

In 1584, during the Eighty Years' War, the town of Hulst fell under Spanish rule. The Dutch States Party then had the lands of Hulst flooded to protect the city of Antwerp from Spanish attacks, with the floodwaters nearing Hulst to several kilometers. In response the Spanish, in order to prevent a States invasion army from being able to disembark so close to Hulst, the Spaniards built Fort Zandberg, east of Hulst in 1586. Between the fort and the town also a 2nd fort was built; Fort de Grote Rape.

In 1591 Hulst and the 2 forts were taken by States troops led by Maurits, Prince of Orange. He then ordered the construction of Fort Moerschans, between the town and Fort de Grote Rape. The 3 forts and the town were then all connected together with a line dyke with a covered way, called the "Line of Communication East of Hulst". At that time Fort Moerschans would have had a rectangular layout.

In 1596 Hulst and the forts were taken back by the Spanish. It was only in 1645 that Hulst and the forts were retaken by the States troops. Fort Moerschans was later damaged in the Flood of 1682.

In the early 18th century, during the War of the Spanish Succession, Fort Moerschans was strengthened by the Dutch military engineer Menno van Coehoorn, by equipping it with bastions at each of the 4 corners of the fort, resulting in its present layout of a starfort. After that the forts and line fell out of use and in 1816 were finally abandoned. During the Belgian Revolution of 1830 the forts were manned for a short time by Dutch troops.

At present the site of Fort Moerschans is freely accessible. The site is now part forest island and public park. The earth ramparts west of the line dyke have been excavated. There are no remains of buildings. A nice natural setting.


Gallery

Fort Moerschans

Fort Moerschans

Fort Moerschans lies north east of the fortified town of Hulst, in the province of Zeeland in the Netherlands.

In 1584, during the Eighty Years' War, the town of Hulst fell under Spanish rule. The Dutch States Party then had the lands of Hulst flooded to protect the city of Antwerp from Spanish attacks, with the floodwaters nearing Hulst to several kilometers. In response the Spanish, in order to prevent a States invasion army from being able to disembark so close to Hulst, the Spaniards built Fort Zandberg, east of Hulst in 1586. Between the fort and the town also a 2nd fort was built; Fort de Grote Rape.

In 1591 Hulst and the 2 forts were taken by States troops led by Maurits, Prince of Orange. He then ordered the construction of Fort Moerschans, between the town and Fort de Grote Rape. The 3 forts and the town were then all connected together with a line dyke with a covered way, called the "Line of Communication East of Hulst". At that time Fort Moerschans would have had a rectangular layout.

In 1596 Hulst and the forts were taken back by the Spanish. It was only in 1645 that Hulst and the forts were retaken by the States troops. Fort Moerschans was later damaged in the Flood of 1682.

In the early 18th century, during the War of the Spanish Succession, Fort Moerschans was strengthened by the Dutch military engineer Menno van Coehoorn, by equipping it with bastions at each of the 4 corners of the fort, resulting in its present layout of a starfort. After that the forts and line fell out of use and in 1816 were finally abandoned. During the Belgian Revolution of 1830 the forts were manned for a short time by Dutch troops.

At present the site of Fort Moerschans is freely accessible. The site is now part forest island and public park. The earth ramparts west of the line dyke have been excavated. There are no remains of buildings. A nice natural setting.


Gallery