Ferrette Castle

Ferrette Castle, locally known as Château de Ferrette or Burg Hohenpfirt, lies on a hill in the village of the same name in the Haut-Rhin department in France. This area is also known as the Southern Alsace, the Alsatian Jura or the Sundgau.

Ferrette Castle is one of the oldest castles in the area; it was first mentioned in 1105, but probably already existed in 1040. It was probably built on the ruin of a Roman watchtower by a son of the Count of Montbéliard. His family later became Counts of Ferrette and used the castle as their main base. The Counts of Ferrette were very powerful and therefore had many conflicts with the Bishop of Basel. After the death of the last Count of Ferrette, possession of the castle passed to Albert II, the Habsburg Duke of Austria, in 1324 through marriage.

During the 15th and 16th century the castle was restored, rebuilt and enlarged several times. The Archdukes of Austria adapted it to the use of firearms between 1571 and 1615.

During the Thirty Years' War, in 1632, the castle was taken by Swedish troops. They were driven out by rebellious peasants 2 years later, only to return immediately with reinforcements after which they laid waste to the town and partially destroyed the castle. In 1635 the castle was partially burnt and destroyed by French troops. Only the lower part of the castle was restored afterwards. In 1648, by the Peace of Westphalia which ended the Thirty Years' War, the lands and lordships of the Habsburgs in Alsace, including Ferrette Castle, passed into the hands of the King of France.

Ferrette Castle was sold in 1721 to the Ferrette-Carspach family. They then tore down the ruined upper part of the castle. The Princes of Monaco became owners of the castle in 1777 through marriage. The present Prince of Monaco still holds the title of Count of Ferrette to this day. During the Great Fear in 1789 the castle was looted and burnt down by rebellious peasants after which it was abandoned. From then on it served as a quarry for the locals.

At present Ferrette Castle is freely accessible. The ruins may not be very spectacular but the view over the surrounding countryside is very beautiful.


Gallery

Ferrette Castle

Ferrette Castle, locally known as Château de Ferrette or Burg Hohenpfirt, lies on a hill in the village of the same name in the Haut-Rhin department in France. This area is also known as the Southern Alsace, the Alsatian Jura or the Sundgau.

Ferrette Castle is one of the oldest castles in the area; it was first mentioned in 1105, but probably already existed in 1040. It was probably built on the ruin of a Roman watchtower by a son of the Count of Montbéliard. His family later became Counts of Ferrette and used the castle as their main base. The Counts of Ferrette were very powerful and therefore had many conflicts with the Bishop of Basel. After the death of the last Count of Ferrette, possession of the castle passed to Albert II, the Habsburg Duke of Austria, in 1324 through marriage.

During the 15th and 16th century the castle was restored, rebuilt and enlarged several times. The Archdukes of Austria adapted it to the use of firearms between 1571 and 1615.

During the Thirty Years' War, in 1632, the castle was taken by Swedish troops. They were driven out by rebellious peasants 2 years later, only to return immediately with reinforcements after which they laid waste to the town and partially destroyed the castle. In 1635 the castle was partially burnt and destroyed by French troops. Only the lower part of the castle was restored afterwards. In 1648, by the Peace of Westphalia which ended the Thirty Years' War, the lands and lordships of the Habsburgs in Alsace, including Ferrette Castle, passed into the hands of the King of France.

Ferrette Castle was sold in 1721 to the Ferrette-Carspach family. They then tore down the ruined upper part of the castle. The Princes of Monaco became owners of the castle in 1777 through marriage. The present Prince of Monaco still holds the title of Count of Ferrette to this day. During the Great Fear in 1789 the castle was looted and burnt down by rebellious peasants after which it was abandoned. From then on it served as a quarry for the locals.

At present Ferrette Castle is freely accessible. The ruins may not be very spectacular but the view over the surrounding countryside is very beautiful.


Gallery