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Époisses Castle

Château d'Epoisses

Époisses Castle, locally known as Château d'Époisses, lies in the village of the same name in the Côte-d'Or department in France.

Tradition has it that Époisses Castle dates back to the 6th century when it would have been a royal residence for several times to the Merovingian queen-regent Brunhilda of Austrasia and her grandson Theudebert II.

When exactly Époisses Castle was founded is unknown. Estimations range from the 9th to the 12th century, when it grew from a manor into a castle. In 1189 it was owned by the Duke of Burgundy; Hugh III and he exchanged it for Montbard Castle. The Counts of Montbard owned Epoisses until 1237 when it passed to the De Mello family.

The De Mello's entertained the Burgundian Duke Philip the Bold at their castle in 1377. The De Mello's bequeathed the castle to the Bourgogne-Montagu family in 1422. Philip II the Good, Duke of Burgundy, used the castle as his base of operations against the city of Avallon, in 1433. During the rest of the 15th century it was taken forcibly several times.

During the 16th century Époisses changed hands several times due to marriages or being sold. During the 1560's it was transformed considerably. In 1591, during the French Wars of Religion, the French Catholic League seized the castle and held it for the next 4 years. They first pillaged it and then built additional fortifications.

In 1661 the castle passed to Guillaume de Pechpeyrou-Comminges, Count of Guitaut, through marriage. During the rest of the 17th century he restored and transformed the old stronghold into a pleasant and comfortable residence.

During the French Revolution the descendants of Guillaume still owned the castle and several family members emigrated. The Committee of Public Safety deemed the castle too dangerous and ordered the fortified parts of the castle to be razed. This is how the south side of the castle disappeared and the remaining towers were brought back to the roof height of the remaining residential wings. The Pechpeyrou-Comminges later regained possession of their castle and restored it to its present appearance. They still own the castle to this day.

At present Époisses Castle can be visited. The park can be visited for a small fee. The interior can only be visited by groups on prior appointment during summer months. A very nice castle.


Gallery

previousnext

Époisses Castle

Château d'Epoisses

Époisses Castle, locally known as Château d'Époisses, lies in the village of the same name in the Côte-d'Or department in France.

Tradition has it that Époisses Castle dates back to the 6th century when it would have been a royal residence for several times to the Merovingian queen-regent Brunhilda of Austrasia and her grandson Theudebert II.

When exactly Époisses Castle was founded is unknown. Estimations range from the 9th to the 12th century, when it grew from a manor into a castle. In 1189 it was owned by the Duke of Burgundy; Hugh III and he exchanged it for Montbard Castle. The Counts of Montbard owned Epoisses until 1237 when it passed to the De Mello family.

The De Mello's entertained the Burgundian Duke Philip the Bold at their castle in 1377. The De Mello's bequeathed the castle to the Bourgogne-Montagu family in 1422. Philip II the Good, Duke of Burgundy, used the castle as his base of operations against the city of Avallon, in 1433. During the rest of the 15th century it was taken forcibly several times.

During the 16th century Époisses changed hands several times due to marriages or being sold. During the 1560's it was transformed considerably. In 1591, during the French Wars of Religion, the French Catholic League seized the castle and held it for the next 4 years. They first pillaged it and then built additional fortifications.

In 1661 the castle passed to Guillaume de Pechpeyrou-Comminges, Count of Guitaut, through marriage. During the rest of the 17th century he restored and transformed the old stronghold into a pleasant and comfortable residence.

During the French Revolution the descendants of Guillaume still owned the castle and several family members emigrated. The Committee of Public Safety deemed the castle too dangerous and ordered the fortified parts of the castle to be razed. This is how the south side of the castle disappeared and the remaining towers were brought back to the roof height of the remaining residential wings. The Pechpeyrou-Comminges later regained possession of their castle and restored it to its present appearance. They still own the castle to this day.

At present Époisses Castle can be visited. The park can be visited for a small fee. The interior can only be visited by groups on prior appointment during summer months. A very nice castle.


Gallery