Diepenbeek Castle

Diepenbeek Castle, locally known as Kasteel van Diepenbeek, lies in the village of the same name, in the province of Limburg in the Flemish region in Belgium.

In 1433 the lands of Diepenbeek were divided between the families of Schoonvorst and Van Gaver on the one hand and the Van Horne and De Merode families on the other hand. Around that time Diepenbeek Castle was built between the village and the Demer river. This was a moated castle of which the present remaining tower was the gate tower or the keep. The castle would have connected to it on the northwest.

In 1663, the Baroness de Merode sold the castle to Baron Edmond Godfries van Bocholt, Grand Commander of the Teutonic Order of Alden Biesen Castle. The L-shaped building next to the tower was then built by the Order in phases in the 2nd half of the 17th century and the 1st half of the 18th century. As it became the seat of stewards of the Order the castle then also became known as the "Rentmeesterij".

During the French occupation of Belgium, in the early 19th century, Diepenbeek became a private property. Later part of it would be used as a notary's office.

At present Diepenbeek Castle is private property and will soon be used as private home as it has been recently restored. Too bad, I would like to see the interior of the tower. Must be nice to call this your home.


Gallery

Diepenbeek Castle

Diepenbeek Castle, locally known as Kasteel van Diepenbeek, lies in the village of the same name, in the province of Limburg in the Flemish region in Belgium.

In 1433 the lands of Diepenbeek were divided between the families of Schoonvorst and Van Gaver on the one hand and the Van Horne and De Merode families on the other hand. Around that time Diepenbeek Castle was built between the village and the Demer river. This was a moated castle of which the present remaining tower was the gate tower or the keep. The castle would have connected to it on the northwest.

In 1663, the Baroness de Merode sold the castle to Baron Edmond Godfries van Bocholt, Grand Commander of the Teutonic Order of Alden Biesen Castle. The L-shaped building next to the tower was then built by the Order in phases in the 2nd half of the 17th century and the 1st half of the 18th century. As it became the seat of stewards of the Order the castle then also became known as the "Rentmeesterij".

During the French occupation of Belgium, in the early 19th century, Diepenbeek became a private property. Later part of it would be used as a notary's office.

At present Diepenbeek Castle is private property and will soon be used as private home as it has been recently restored. Too bad, I would like to see the interior of the tower. Must be nice to call this your home.


Gallery