Cusago Castle

Cusago Castle

Cusago Castle, locally more commonly known as Castello Visconteo di Cusago, lies in the town of the same name, in the Milan province in the Lombardy region in Italy.

Cusago Castle was built at the behest of Bernabò Visconti between 1360 and 1369, probably on the remains of an earlier Lombard structure. It was built to serve as a hunting lodge in the Visconti reserve that extended in the countryside south of Milan between the city and Vigevano. The castle was located at a sufficient distance from Milan to be considered a country residence, yet it was only a few hours' drive from the capital to be considered sufficiently close to the Milanese court.

In 1398, Caterina Visconti, Duchess of Milan and wife to Gian Galeazzo Visconti, Duke of Milan, took refuge in Cusago in an attempt to escape the plague that was spreading throughout Lombardy.

During the 15th century, Filippo Maria Visconti, Duke of Milan, had a special canal dug and a special ducal road laid out, just to reach the castle more easily. During the 3 years of the Golden Ambrosian Republic (1447-1450) Cusago Castle was first used as a hospital, then as a farm and finally closed. It was however restored to its former splendour at the end of the 15th century by the then Duke of Milan; Ludovico Sforza.

To pay off debts, Cusago Castle was sold by Duke Francesco II Sforza to Massimiliano Stampa, 1st Marquess of Soncino, in 1525. Stampa also served as castellan of the Sforza Castle in Milan, from 1531. The Stampas first used the castle as a country residence but in later centuries it transferred to agricultural use and was also used for silk farming in the 18th century.

By 1973 the castle had fallen into decline but was still used as a large farmhouse and inhabited by about 30 families. The Stampas then sold it and for some years ownership of the castle passed between the hands of real estate entrepeneurs, amongst whom Silvio Berlusconi. Finally in 2016 it was bought by a real estate company who started restorations which are still ongoing to this day.

Cusago Castle is being restored so it can not be visited.


Gallery

Cusago Castle

Cusago Castle

Cusago Castle, locally more commonly known as Castello Visconteo di Cusago, lies in the town of the same name, in the Milan province in the Lombardy region in Italy.

Cusago Castle was built at the behest of Bernabò Visconti between 1360 and 1369, probably on the remains of an earlier Lombard structure. It was built to serve as a hunting lodge in the Visconti reserve that extended in the countryside south of Milan between the city and Vigevano. The castle was located at a sufficient distance from Milan to be considered a country residence, yet it was only a few hours' drive from the capital to be considered sufficiently close to the Milanese court.

In 1398, Caterina Visconti, Duchess of Milan and wife to Gian Galeazzo Visconti, Duke of Milan, took refuge in Cusago in an attempt to escape the plague that was spreading throughout Lombardy.

During the 15th century, Filippo Maria Visconti, Duke of Milan, had a special canal dug and a special ducal road laid out, just to reach the castle more easily. During the 3 years of the Golden Ambrosian Republic (1447-1450) Cusago Castle was first used as a hospital, then as a farm and finally closed. It was however restored to its former splendour at the end of the 15th century by the then Duke of Milan; Ludovico Sforza.

To pay off debts, Cusago Castle was sold by Duke Francesco II Sforza to Massimiliano Stampa, 1st Marquess of Soncino, in 1525. Stampa also served as castellan of the Sforza Castle in Milan, from 1531. The Stampas first used the castle as a country residence but in later centuries it transferred to agricultural use and was also used for silk farming in the 18th century.

By 1973 the castle had fallen into decline but was still used as a large farmhouse and inhabited by about 30 families. The Stampas then sold it and for some years ownership of the castle passed between the hands of real estate entrepeneurs, amongst whom Silvio Berlusconi. Finally in 2016 it was bought by a real estate company who started restorations which are still ongoing to this day.

Cusago Castle is being restored so it can not be visited.


Gallery