Çimenlik Castle

Çimenlik Castle

Çimenlik Castle, locally known as Çimenlik Kalesi or Kale-i Sultaniye, lies on the shore in the center of the city of Çanakkale, in the province of Çanakkale in Turkey.

In 1452, during his preparation for the siege of Byzantine Constantinople, the Ottoman Sultan Mehmed II acknowledged the strategic importance of the Dardanelles Strait. So, in order to cut off the sea route that could supply or be used by European forces to relieve the city, he started to build 2 castles at the narrowest point of the strait; Çimenlik on the Asian side and Kilitbahir on the European side. These castles served a similar purpose as the castles of Rumelihisarı and Anadoluhisarı on the Bosphorus Strait.

Although, there are some sources that state that they were built after the 1453 conquest of Constantinople, around 1463. In that case they were probably built to prevent European forces to try and retake the city.

Çimenlik, built near the point where the Sariçay river (a.k.a. Çanakkale Stream) flows into the strait, was built with a rectangular curtain wall with 9 towers around a sturdy rectangular keep. It was armed with about 30 cannons.

The castle was first strengthened in 1551 by Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent. During the Cretan War with Venice (1645-69) the Ottomans again restored it. In the late 18th century it underwent its biggest modification; Sultan Selim III had the seaward walls of the castle largely rebuild into modern artillery platforms and ammunition stores following the designs of a French advisor.

During the Gallipoli Campaign in WW I, Çimenlik Castle was attacked by French and British battleships. The HMS Queen Elizabeth fired a shell which hit the inner face of the north curtain wall. It caused a large hole but didn't explode and is still embedded in the wall to this day.

At present Çimenlik Castle houses the Çanakkale Naval Museum. The museum can be visited for a fee. A great castle. The exterior of its west, south and east walls can not be easily seen because that area is closed off to visitors as military terrain. Too bad.


Gallery

 

Çimenlik Castle

Çimenlik Castle

Çimenlik Castle, locally known as Çimenlik Kalesi or Kale-i Sultaniye, lies on the shore in the center of the city of Çanakkale, in the province of Çanakkale in Turkey.

In 1452, during his preparation for the siege of Byzantine Constantinople, the Ottoman Sultan Mehmed II acknowledged the strategic importance of the Dardanelles Strait. So, in order to cut off the sea route that could supply or be used by European forces to relieve the city, he started to build 2 castles at the narrowest point of the strait; Çimenlik on the Asian side and Kilitbahir on the European side. These castles served a similar purpose as the castles of Rumelihisarı and Anadoluhisarı on the Bosphorus Strait.

Although, there are some sources that state that they were built after the 1453 conquest of Constantinople, around 1463. In that case they were probably built to prevent European forces to try and retake the city.

Çimenlik, built near the point where the Sariçay river (a.k.a. Çanakkale Stream) flows into the strait, was built with a rectangular curtain wall with 9 towers around a sturdy rectangular keep. It was armed with about 30 cannons.

The castle was first strengthened in 1551 by Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent. During the Cretan War with Venice (1645-69) the Ottomans again restored it. In the late 18th century it underwent its biggest modification; Sultan Selim III had the seaward walls of the castle largely rebuild into modern artillery platforms and ammunition stores following the designs of a French advisor.

During the Gallipoli Campaign in WW I, Çimenlik Castle was attacked by French and British battleships. The HMS Queen Elizabeth fired a shell which hit the inner face of the north curtain wall. It caused a large hole but didn't explode and is still embedded in the wall to this day.

At present Çimenlik Castle houses the Çanakkale Naval Museum. The museum can be visited for a fee. A great castle. The exterior of its west, south and east walls can not be easily seen because that area is closed off to visitors as military terrain. Too bad.


Gallery