Cahir Castle

Cahir Castle

Cahir Castle lies in the center of the town of the same name, in County Tipperary, in Ireland.

Cahir Castle was probably built during the mid-13th century when the descendants of Philip of Worcester moved from their seat, a motte-and-bailey castle at Knockgraffon, to their new castle. It was built on a rocky island in the River Suir where maybe an earlier stone fort had been.

In the early 14th century the castle passed to the Bermingham family through marriage but it reverted to the Crown after the execution of Sir William de Bermingham in 1332. In 1375 the Crown granted Cahir to James Butler, 3rd Earl of Ormond.

During the 15th and 16th centuries the castle was gradually rebuilt and improved. Through intermarriage the castle had become the seat of the Desmond Fitzgeralds.

Robert Deveraux, the 2nd Earl of Essex laid siege to Cahir Castle in 1599. The castle's commander; James Galida Butler, was the younger brother of Thomas Butler, 2nd Lord Cahir, who actually was with the attacking force, but he refused to surrender. The castle was taken after 3 days, with the use of cannons. James however had escaped by swimming under the adjacent water mill. He then successfully recaptured the castle the following year and held it for some months. The Butler's finally regained possession of the castle in 1601.

During the Irish Confederate Wars the castle was besieged twice. First in 1647, when it was captured by Murrough O'Brien, 1st Earl of Inchiquin, after a short siege. Secondly in 1650, when it was surrendered to Oliver Cromwell and his troops without a fight. After that the castle stayed in possession of the Butlers but was never used as a residence again.

The Butlers restored the ruined castle in the 1840's and in 1964, after the death of Richard Butler Charteris, it was taken into State care and became a National Monument.

Cahir Castle is now a museum and can be visited for a fee. A great castle, recommended!


Gallery

Cahir Castle

Cahir Castle

Cahir Castle lies in the center of the town of the same name, in County Tipperary, in Ireland.

Cahir Castle was probably built during the mid-13th century when the descendants of Philip of Worcester moved from their seat, a motte-and-bailey castle at Knockgraffon, to their new castle. It was built on a rocky island in the River Suir where maybe an earlier stone fort had been.

In the early 14th century the castle passed to the Bermingham family through marriage but it reverted to the Crown after the execution of Sir William de Bermingham in 1332. In 1375 the Crown granted Cahir to James Butler, 3rd Earl of Ormond.

During the 15th and 16th centuries the castle was gradually rebuilt and improved. Through intermarriage the castle had become the seat of the Desmond Fitzgeralds.

Robert Deveraux, the 2nd Earl of Essex laid siege to Cahir Castle in 1599. The castle's commander; James Galida Butler, was the younger brother of Thomas Butler, 2nd Lord Cahir, who actually was with the attacking force, but he refused to surrender. The castle was taken after 3 days, with the use of cannons. James however had escaped by swimming under the adjacent water mill. He then successfully recaptured the castle the following year and held it for some months. The Butler's finally regained possession of the castle in 1601.

During the Irish Confederate Wars the castle was besieged twice. First in 1647, when it was captured by Murrough O'Brien, 1st Earl of Inchiquin, after a short siege. Secondly in 1650, when it was surrendered to Oliver Cromwell and his troops without a fight. After that the castle stayed in possession of the Butlers but was never used as a residence again.

The Butlers restored the ruined castle in the 1840's and in 1964, after the death of Richard Butler Charteris, it was taken into State care and became a National Monument.

Cahir Castle is now a museum and can be visited for a fee. A great castle, recommended!


Gallery