Bodiam Castle

Bodiam Castle

Bodiam Castle lies next to the hamlet of the same name, in the county of East Sussex in England.

Bodiam Castle was built by Sir Edward Dalyngrigge, a former knight of Edward III, with the permission of Richard II, in 1385. Its purpose was to defend the area against possible French raids during the Hundred Years' War. The square moated castle was built without a keep and although its purpose was defense, displaying Dalyngrigge's status was also an important aspect of its design. The castle stayed in the hands of the Dalyngrigge family until 1470, when it passed to the Lewknor family through inheritance.

In 1483 the castle was conficated by the Crown, as the Lewknors were accused of treason, probably after a siege. In 1485 it was returned to them by the new king Henry VII of England. The Lewknors kept possession of the castle until 1543 when Sir Roger Lewknor died. The manor and castle were split and sold by his descendants. The castle was purchased by John Levett of Salehurst.

In 1631 castle and manor were reunited when John Tufton, 2nd Earl of Thanet, bought the castle. Tufton, a Royalist, was fined heavily by Parliament during the English Civil War and ended up selling Bodiam to Nathaniel Powell, a Parliamentarian, to help pay his fine. Probably after this sale the castle was dismantled by destroying the barbican, the bridges and the structures inside the castle. After that it remained a ruin.

The Webster family acquired Bodiam Castle in 1722 and it passed down through the family for over a century. It was at that period that the site became an early kind of tourist attraction and it was depicted in drawings as a romantic ruin overgrown in ivy. The Websters sold the castle in 1829 through auction to John 'Mad Jack' Fuller, a squire and politician. It is said Fuller bought it to prevent the Websters from tearing it down and reusing its materials. Fuller then partially restored the castle ruin.

Fuller's grandson sold the castle in 1849 to George Cubitt, 1st Baron Ashcombe. Cubitt then also restored parts of the castle but at the same time took care to preserve the romantic ivy covered appearance of the castle, which was then a fashion.

Lord George Curzon acquired Bodiam in 1916 and also restored parts of the castle before gifting it to the National Trust in 1925.

At present Bodiam Castle can be visited for a fee. A great castle ruin to visit, even on a rainy day.


Gallery

Bodiam Castle

Bodiam Castle

Bodiam Castle lies next to the hamlet of the same name, in the county of East Sussex in England.

Bodiam Castle was built by Sir Edward Dalyngrigge, a former knight of Edward III, with the permission of Richard II, in 1385. Its purpose was to defend the area against possible French raids during the Hundred Years' War. The square moated castle was built without a keep and although its purpose was defense, displaying Dalyngrigge's status was also an important aspect of its design. The castle stayed in the hands of the Dalyngrigge family until 1470, when it passed to the Lewknor family through inheritance.

In 1483 the castle was conficated by the Crown, as the Lewknors were accused of treason, probably after a siege. In 1485 it was returned to them by the new king Henry VII of England. The Lewknors kept possession of the castle until 1543 when Sir Roger Lewknor died. The manor and castle were split and sold by his descendants. The castle was purchased by John Levett of Salehurst.

In 1631 castle and manor were reunited when John Tufton, 2nd Earl of Thanet, bought the castle. Tufton, a Royalist, was fined heavily by Parliament during the English Civil War and ended up selling Bodiam to Nathaniel Powell, a Parliamentarian, to help pay his fine. Probably after this sale the castle was dismantled by destroying the barbican, the bridges and the structures inside the castle. After that it remained a ruin.

The Webster family acquired Bodiam Castle in 1722 and it passed down through the family for over a century. It was at that period that the site became an early kind of tourist attraction and it was depicted in drawings as a romantic ruin overgrown in ivy. The Websters sold the castle in 1829 through auction to John 'Mad Jack' Fuller, a squire and politician. It is said Fuller bought it to prevent the Websters from tearing it down and reusing its materials. Fuller then partially restored the castle ruin.

Fuller's grandson sold the castle in 1849 to George Cubitt, 1st Baron Ashcombe. Cubitt then also restored parts of the castle but at the same time took care to preserve the romantic ivy covered appearance of the castle, which was then a fashion.

Lord George Curzon acquired Bodiam in 1916 and also restored parts of the castle before gifting it to the National Trust in 1925.

At present Bodiam Castle can be visited for a fee. A great castle ruin to visit, even on a rainy day.


Gallery