Yoğurtçu Castle

Yoğurtçu Castle, locally known as Yoğurtçu Kalesi or Kale, lies on a hill south of the village Uzunburun, in the province of Manisa in Turkey.

Although some Roman artifacts were found here, Yoğurtçu Castle is certainly a medieval structure, built by the Byzantines during the 13th century as a precaution against the Arab raids into their territory. It was built on a strategic point overlooking the valley of the ancient Hermos River, now called the Gediz River. During the Ottoman Period the castle was largely destroyed.

Some sources state that Yoğurtçu Castle was in fact a fortified monastery, called Sosandra by the Byzantines. There are however no traces of a church. The castle has not been excavated yet, so if these statements are correct is unknown.

Its present name Yoğurtçu was given in recent centuries. It is said to translate to 'yoghurt maker'. The story goes that yoghurt and milk were used to make the mortar for the walls. Another explanation is that during Ottoman times the site was used by locals to make or store yoghurt.

This is a great castle ruin. At present it is inhabited by a flock of sheep who seek shelter from the heat of the sun in a large room inside. And although they were rather scared of me, they didn't let themselves be moved very easily.

Yoğurtçu Castle is freely accessible.


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Yoğurtçu Castle

Yoğurtçu Castle, locally known as Yoğurtçu Kalesi or Kale, lies on a hill south of the village Uzunburun, in the province of Manisa in Turkey.

Although some Roman artifacts were found here, Yoğurtçu Castle is certainly a medieval structure, built by the Byzantines during the 13th century as a precaution against the Arab raids into their territory. It was built on a strategic point overlooking the valley of the ancient Hermos River, now called the Gediz River. During the Ottoman Period the castle was largely destroyed.

Some sources state that Yoğurtçu Castle was in fact a fortified monastery, called Sosandra by the Byzantines. There are however no traces of a church. The castle has not been excavated yet, so if these statements are correct is unknown.

Its present name Yoğurtçu was given in recent centuries. It is said to translate to 'yoghurt maker'. The story goes that yoghurt and milk were used to make the mortar for the walls. Another explanation is that during Ottoman times the site was used by locals to make or store yoghurt.

This is a great castle ruin. At present it is inhabited by a flock of sheep who seek shelter from the heat of the sun in a large room inside. And although they were rather scared of me, they didn't let themselves be moved very easily.

Yoğurtçu Castle is freely accessible.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://castles.nl/yogurtcu-castle#sigFreeId33743fb470