Wasenbourg Castle

Wasenbourg Castle, locally known as Château du Wasenbourg, lies in the woods north-west of the city of Niederbronn-les-Bains, in the Bas-Rhin department in France. This area is also known as the Northern Alsace or the Northern Vosges.

In Roman times the site of Wasenbourg Castle was the site of a temple dedicated to the god Mercury. On a small rock, some 20 m from the castle, then stood a wooden watchtower. The Romans abandoned the site during the 5th century.

A fortification called Wasenbourg was mentioned during the 8th century. It would have been made out of wood, situated on the foundations of the Roman temple.

Wasenbourg Castle was built or rebuilt in 1273 by the Bishop of Strasbourg. The bishop gave it as a fief to the Lords of Lichtenberg. From 1378 on the castle was mortgaged by the Lords of Lichtenberg to different families several times. In 1480 ownership of the castle passed to the Counts of Zweibrücken-Bitsch through inheritance and marriage.

In 1525, during the German Peasants' War, the castle was damaged and afterwards dilapidated. In 1570, already uninhabitable, the castle passed to the Counts of Hanau-Lichtenberg through inheritance. By 1592 it was described as a ruin. In 1677 it was finally dismantled by the troops of Louis XIV of France.

In 1770 the ruin was visited by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, the famous German writer.

Wasenbourg Castle is peculiar in that it does not have a keep. Instead a 18 to 22 m high, nearly 20 m wide and 4 m thick shield wall protects the noble residence. The castle has some beautiful architectural elements, amongst them an exceptional Gothic bay window with 9 lancets and 7 rosettes.

Wasenbourg Castle is freely accessible but it will take a hike of at least 45 minutes to reach it. But the effort is worth it. A very nice castle ruin.


Gallery

Wasenbourg Castle

Wasenbourg Castle, locally known as Château du Wasenbourg, lies in the woods north-west of the city of Niederbronn-les-Bains, in the Bas-Rhin department in France. This area is also known as the Northern Alsace or the Northern Vosges.

In Roman times the site of Wasenbourg Castle was the site of a temple dedicated to the god Mercury. On a small rock, some 20 m from the castle, then stood a wooden watchtower. The Romans abandoned the site during the 5th century.

A fortification called Wasenbourg was mentioned during the 8th century. It would have been made out of wood, situated on the foundations of the Roman temple.

Wasenbourg Castle was built or rebuilt in 1273 by the Bishop of Strasbourg. The bishop gave it as a fief to the Lords of Lichtenberg. From 1378 on the castle was mortgaged by the Lords of Lichtenberg to different families several times. In 1480 ownership of the castle passed to the Counts of Zweibrücken-Bitsch through inheritance and marriage.

In 1525, during the German Peasants' War, the castle was damaged and afterwards dilapidated. In 1570, already uninhabitable, the castle passed to the Counts of Hanau-Lichtenberg through inheritance. By 1592 it was described as a ruin. In 1677 it was finally dismantled by the troops of Louis XIV of France.

In 1770 the ruin was visited by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, the famous German writer.

Wasenbourg Castle is peculiar in that it does not have a keep. Instead a 18 to 22 m high, nearly 20 m wide and 4 m thick shield wall protects the noble residence. The castle has some beautiful architectural elements, amongst them an exceptional Gothic bay window with 9 lancets and 7 rosettes.

Wasenbourg Castle is freely accessible but it will take a hike of at least 45 minutes to reach it. But the effort is worth it. A very nice castle ruin.


Gallery