Vandalian Tower

Vandalian Tower, locally also known as Lady Hamilton's Folly, stands in a field south of the village of South Harting, in the county of West Sussex in England.

This ruined tower of course never was a fortification. It was built as a folly in 1774 by the architect Henry Keene for Sir Matthew Fetherstonhaugh, 1st Baronet. It was built to celebrate the founding of the American settlement of Vandalia, a proposed British colony.

After the American War of Independence the small colony tried in vain to become a state by the name of "Westsylvania" and its territory was divided up between the states now known as West Virginia and Kentucky. After that the Vandalian Tower was abandoned, possibly out of embarrassment for the too quick self-congratulation.

At the end of the 18th century Emma, Lady Hamilton, is said to have visited the tower frequently to watch for Lord Nelson's returning ship from it. The tower was partly destroyed by fire in 1842 and the ruins were stabilised in 1982.

At present Vandalian Tower can freely be visited. The ruin itself however is fenced off to protect if from further deterioration.


Gallery

Vandalian Tower

Vandalian Tower, locally also known as Lady Hamilton's Folly, stands in a field south of the village of South Harting, in the county of West Sussex in England.

This ruined tower of course never was a fortification. It was built as a folly in 1774 by the architect Henry Keene for Sir Matthew Fetherstonhaugh, 1st Baronet. It was built to celebrate the founding of the American settlement of Vandalia, a proposed British colony.

After the American War of Independence the small colony tried in vain to become a state by the name of "Westsylvania" and its territory was divided up between the states now known as West Virginia and Kentucky. After that the Vandalian Tower was abandoned, possibly out of embarrassment for the too quick self-congratulation.

At the end of the 18th century Emma, Lady Hamilton, is said to have visited the tower frequently to watch for Lord Nelson's returning ship from it. The tower was partly destroyed by fire in 1842 and the ruins were stabilised in 1982.

At present Vandalian Tower can freely be visited. The ruin itself however is fenced off to protect if from further deterioration.


Gallery