Tonquédec Castle

Tonquédec Castle, locally known as Château de Tonquédec, lies north west of the village same name, in the Côtes-d'Armor department in France.

Tonquédec Castle was built in the 12th century by the lords of Coëtmen-Penthièvre. It was built at the end of a plateau overlooking the Léguer valley.

In 1394/5 the castle was partially dismantled by John IV, Duke of Brittany, because the Viscounts of Tonquédec had sided with his opponent Olivier de Clisson during a rebellion. From 1406 Roland III of Coëtmen started to rebuild the castle after having sided with the duke again.

Through marriages and successions Tonquédec Castle passed through several families, like the Acigné. In the 2nd part of the 16th century it the Goyon de la Moussaye family were viscounts of Tonquédec. In 1577 the castle was to be adapted to the advancement of artillery and they then added the outer enclosure to the castle. 

In 1626 the castle was considered to be a danger for the French Crown, so Cardinal Richelieu issued an order for its demolition. Out of respect for the loyalty of the Goyon de la Moussaye family the castle was then dismantled instead of completely razed. René du Quengo then acquired the ruin in 1636. His descendants owned the castle ruin until 1801 when they had to sell it due to financial problems. It was sold back to them in 1828, only to be sold to a merchant in 1878. This merchant had plans to use the ruins as a quarry and sell its stones.

In 1880 the Marquis de Kéroüartz bought the castle as a wedding present to his daughter, who was marrying Pierre de Rougé. The Rougé family were descendants in a direct line to the lords of Coëtmen, the original builders of the castle. The Counts of Rougé still own it today.

The castle consists of an inner and outer enclosure. The inner enclosure is defended by a mighty 2-towered gate building, a secondary keep and an artillery tower. In front of it would have been a moat with a drawbridge. On the other side of the inner enclosure stands the main keep, which is situated outside the walls.

At present Tonquédec Castle can be visited for a small fee during the summer months. This is a great castle ruin in a very lush and green countryside. Recommended.


Gallery

Tonquédec Castle

Tonquédec Castle, locally known as Château de Tonquédec, lies north west of the village same name, in the Côtes-d'Armor department in France.

Tonquédec Castle was built in the 12th century by the lords of Coëtmen-Penthièvre. It was built at the end of a plateau overlooking the Léguer valley.

In 1394/5 the castle was partially dismantled by John IV, Duke of Brittany, because the Viscounts of Tonquédec had sided with his opponent Olivier de Clisson during a rebellion. From 1406 Roland III of Coëtmen started to rebuild the castle after having sided with the duke again.

Through marriages and successions Tonquédec Castle passed through several families, like the Acigné. In the 2nd part of the 16th century it the Goyon de la Moussaye family were viscounts of Tonquédec. In 1577 the castle was to be adapted to the advancement of artillery and they then added the outer enclosure to the castle. 

In 1626 the castle was considered to be a danger for the French Crown, so Cardinal Richelieu issued an order for its demolition. Out of respect for the loyalty of the Goyon de la Moussaye family the castle was then dismantled instead of completely razed. René du Quengo then acquired the ruin in 1636. His descendants owned the castle ruin until 1801 when they had to sell it due to financial problems. It was sold back to them in 1828, only to be sold to a merchant in 1878. This merchant had plans to use the ruins as a quarry and sell its stones.

In 1880 the Marquis de Kéroüartz bought the castle as a wedding present to his daughter, who was marrying Pierre de Rougé. The Rougé family were descendants in a direct line to the lords of Coëtmen, the original builders of the castle. The Counts of Rougé still own it today.

The castle consists of an inner and outer enclosure. The inner enclosure is defended by a mighty 2-towered gate building, a secondary keep and an artillery tower. In front of it would have been a moat with a drawbridge. On the other side of the inner enclosure stands the main keep, which is situated outside the walls.

At present Tonquédec Castle can be visited for a small fee during the summer months. This is a great castle ruin in a very lush and green countryside. Recommended.


Gallery