Togher Castle

Togher Castle lies in a field in the valley of the River Bandon in the townland of Togher, in County Cork in Ireland.

Togher Castle is thought to have been built by Tadhg an Fhorsa of the MacCarthys of Glenacroim, directly after his clan had been granted the land by the English Queen in 1590, to consolidate his hold on the clan.

During the Nine Years' War Tadgh sided with the rebels but did little. And although he was pardoned in 1599, the castle was occupied by English troops after the defeat of the Spanish in 1602. In 1615 Tadgh moved back in with his family and 1618 he was regranted the castle by King James I.

During the Irish Rebellion of 1641 Tadgh's son; called Tadgh an Duna, had joined the rebellion. He was dispossessed in the aftermath and Togher Castle was granted to the Hoares of Iretons army. In 1666 it was unroofed.

Shortly before 1895 the castle was reroofed with a slate roof by a Father Lyons, a schoolteacher. He also altered some windows and chimneys and took up residence in the castle. The remaining corrugated iron roof also dates back to the 19th century. However, the castle was abandoned not long afterwards.

Togher Castle is situated on private farmland but a kind request to the farmer may grant you access, as it did in my case. Although the tower itself can not be entered. A very nice tower house.


Gallery

Togher Castle

Togher Castle lies in a field in the valley of the River Bandon in the townland of Togher, in County Cork in Ireland.

Togher Castle is thought to have been built by Tadhg an Fhorsa of the MacCarthys of Glenacroim, directly after his clan had been granted the land by the English Queen in 1590, to consolidate his hold on the clan.

During the Nine Years' War Tadgh sided with the rebels but did little. And although he was pardoned in 1599, the castle was occupied by English troops after the defeat of the Spanish in 1602. In 1615 Tadgh moved back in with his family and 1618 he was regranted the castle by King James I.

During the Irish Rebellion of 1641 Tadgh's son; called Tadgh an Duna, had joined the rebellion. He was dispossessed in the aftermath and Togher Castle was granted to the Hoares of Iretons army. In 1666 it was unroofed.

Shortly before 1895 the castle was reroofed with a slate roof by a Father Lyons, a schoolteacher. He also altered some windows and chimneys and took up residence in the castle. The remaining corrugated iron roof also dates back to the 19th century. However, the castle was abandoned not long afterwards.

Togher Castle is situated on private farmland but a kind request to the farmer may grant you access, as it did in my case. Although the tower itself can not be entered. A very nice tower house.


Gallery