Surami Castle

Surami Castle lies in the town of the same name, in the Khashuri municipality in the Shida Kartli region in Georgia.

Surami Castle was probably built in the 12th or 13th century when the town became heavily fortified. It sits on a large rock in the center of town, strategically located at the entrance into the Borjomi Gorge and guarding the road from eastern to western Georgia.

From the 1170s to the latter part of the 14th century, the castle was a hereditary fief of the dynasty of the Eristavis (dukes) of Kartli. After that the castle fell into decline.

In 1625 when the area was under the rule of the Iranian Safavids, it was taken and rebuilt by Prince Giorgi Saakadze, the famous Georgian politician and military commander. In 1692 it was in the hands of the Ottomans. After their expulsion it became a major base for rebels against the Iranian Safavids.

During the rebellion against the Safavid Empire in 1742-45, Surami Castle became the principal bastion of Prince Givi Amilakhvari. The Persian army of Nader Shah, led by Teimuraz II of Kakheti and his son Erekle II, who had sided with the Shah, laid siege to the castle. They were unable to take it. They then tried to blow up the castle walls twice but still did not succeed. At last Amilakhvari was persuaded to surrender and Nader Shah ordered the demolition of the castle.

Soon Surami Castle was rebuilt by the Georgians and they kept it until 1782. Then it was exploited by the Russo-Georgian troops in anti-Ottoman operations during the Russo-Turkish War of 1768–1774.

According to sources, the castle was still operative in 1801. But later that century it gradually lost its significance and fell to ruin.

At present Surami Castle is freely accessible. A nice small castle.


Gallery

Surami Castle

Surami Castle lies in the town of the same name, in the Khashuri municipality in the Shida Kartli region in Georgia.

Surami Castle was probably built in the 12th or 13th century when the town became heavily fortified. It sits on a large rock in the center of town, strategically located at the entrance into the Borjomi Gorge and guarding the road from eastern to western Georgia.

From the 1170s to the latter part of the 14th century, the castle was a hereditary fief of the dynasty of the Eristavis (dukes) of Kartli. After that the castle fell into decline.

In 1625 when the area was under the rule of the Iranian Safavids, it was taken and rebuilt by Prince Giorgi Saakadze, the famous Georgian politician and military commander. In 1692 it was in the hands of the Ottomans. After their expulsion it became a major base for rebels against the Iranian Safavids.

During the rebellion against the Safavid Empire in 1742-45, Surami Castle became the principal bastion of Prince Givi Amilakhvari. The Persian army of Nader Shah, led by Teimuraz II of Kakheti and his son Erekle II, who had sided with the Shah, laid siege to the castle. They were unable to take it. They then tried to blow up the castle walls twice but still did not succeed. At last Amilakhvari was persuaded to surrender and Nader Shah ordered the demolition of the castle.

Soon Surami Castle was rebuilt by the Georgians and they kept it until 1782. Then it was exploited by the Russo-Georgian troops in anti-Ottoman operations during the Russo-Turkish War of 1768–1774.

According to sources, the castle was still operative in 1801. But later that century it gradually lost its significance and fell to ruin.

At present Surami Castle is freely accessible. A nice small castle.


Gallery