Rumelifeneri Castle

Rumelifeneri Castle, locally known as Rumeli Feneri Kalesi or Topçu Kalesi, lies in the village of the same name, on the Black Sea coast in the province of Istanbul in Turkey. It is named after the Rumeli Feneri (meaning Roman Lighthouse) that also gave the village its name.

Historical information about Rumelifeneri Castle is inconclusive. Sometimes it is stated to have first been built by the Genoese during the 15th century, or even earlier by the Byzantines. Most sources, however, state that it is was built by an unknown Greek engineer for the Ottoman Empire, around 1769. Later it was supposedly redesigned by French engineers; in 1783 by Toussaint, in 1785 by Latiffe-Clavé and in 1794 by Monnier.

The castle served as a battery, protecting the northern entrance to the Bosphorus strait from the Black Sea. The castle has a rectangular ground plan with 2 bevelled corners at the northern facade. The eastern and western walls are both equipped with an octagonal tower. The west tower was modified during the 20th century and its interior was fitted with concrete flooring and walls. 

At present Rumelifeneri Castle is freely accessible and, especially during weekends, it is a favorite spot for locals to relax and watch the waves crash on the rocks below the castle walls. A great castle on a very nice location.


Gallery

Rumelifeneri Castle

Rumelifeneri Castle, locally known as Rumeli Feneri Kalesi or Topçu Kalesi, lies in the village of the same name, on the Black Sea coast in the province of Istanbul in Turkey. It is named after the Rumeli Feneri (meaning Roman Lighthouse) that also gave the village its name.

Historical information about Rumelifeneri Castle is inconclusive. Sometimes it is stated to have first been built by the Genoese during the 15th century, or even earlier by the Byzantines. Most sources, however, state that it is was built by an unknown Greek engineer for the Ottoman Empire, around 1769. Later it was supposedly redesigned by French engineers; in 1783 by Toussaint, in 1785 by Latiffe-Clavé and in 1794 by Monnier.

The castle served as a battery, protecting the northern entrance to the Bosphorus strait from the Black Sea. The castle has a rectangular ground plan with 2 bevelled corners at the northern facade. The eastern and western walls are both equipped with an octagonal tower. The west tower was modified during the 20th century and its interior was fitted with concrete flooring and walls. 

At present Rumelifeneri Castle is freely accessible and, especially during weekends, it is a favorite spot for locals to relax and watch the waves crash on the rocks below the castle walls. A great castle on a very nice location.


Gallery