Quintin Castle

Quintin Castle, locally known as Château de Quintin, lies in the town of the same name, in the Côte-d'Armor department in France.

The first castle at this site, mentioned in 1204, was probably built during the 12th century. In 1249 it was replaced by a new castle by Geoffrey I of Penthièvre, a.k.a. Geoffrey I Boterel. That castle survived until the end of the 16th century when it was ravaged by the troops of Philippe Emmanuel, Duke of Mercœr, during the French Wars of Religion.

In 1602 the ruined Quintin Castle was inherited by Henri I, Duke de La Trémoille. He sold it to his brother-in-law the Marquis de La Moussaye in 1633.

The La Moussaye started to demolish the old castle ruins with the intention of building a new castle. His acquisition however was disputed because the La Moussayes were fervent Protestants. They had to accept, in 1640, very harsh conditions: they were not to carry out any construction, not to reside more than 15 days in a row in Quintin and only 4 times a year, not to establish any exercise of the so-called reformed religion and not try to convert anyone.

In 1643 they finally got permission from Anne of Austria to build a new castle, although the conditions related to religion were not removed. Construction works started; foundations, stables and the present faceted corner tower were built. Due to problems with the local clergy, who were still afraid that the La Moussayes were going to spread the Protestant faith, construction commenced slowly and was stopped altogether in 1666. The, by then impoverished, La Moussayes, sold their unfinished castle to Guy-Aldonce de Durfort, Marshal de Lorge, in 1681.

Durfort descendants, who changed his family name into Lorge, then had the stables built by the La Moussayes initially rebuilt into a manor during the 18th century. Later however Quintin Castle was abandoned and only home to an intendant and some officers. In 1775 the castle passed to the Choiseul family through marriage. 

During the French Revolution, at the end of the 18th century, the 17th century tower was used as a prison and salpeter was manufactured in its cellars. Through inheritance the castle ended up in the possession of its present owners; the Bagneux family.

So the present castle buildings were originally the stables of the 17th century castle. The 17th century faceted corner tower and its subterranean basement galleries now stand empty and are being slowly restored with the purpose of making them visitable again.

At present Quintin Castle can be visited for a small fee. It is still private property. Sadly enough it had not yet opened when I came by. The visitable parts of the castle however are just its gardens and the 18th century castle. A curious ensemble.


Gallery

Quintin Castle

Quintin Castle, locally known as Château de Quintin, lies in the town of the same name, in the Côte-d'Armor department in France.

The first castle at this site, mentioned in 1204, was probably built during the 12th century. In 1249 it was replaced by a new castle by Geoffrey I of Penthièvre, a.k.a. Geoffrey I Boterel. That castle survived until the end of the 16th century when it was ravaged by the troops of Philippe Emmanuel, Duke of Mercœr, during the French Wars of Religion.

In 1602 the ruined Quintin Castle was inherited by Henri I, Duke de La Trémoille. He sold it to his brother-in-law the Marquis de La Moussaye in 1633.

The La Moussaye started to demolish the old castle ruins with the intention of building a new castle. His acquisition however was disputed because the La Moussayes were fervent Protestants. They had to accept, in 1640, very harsh conditions: they were not to carry out any construction, not to reside more than 15 days in a row in Quintin and only 4 times a year, not to establish any exercise of the so-called reformed religion and not try to convert anyone.

In 1643 they finally got permission from Anne of Austria to build a new castle, although the conditions related to religion were not removed. Construction works started; foundations, stables and the present faceted corner tower were built. Due to problems with the local clergy, who were still afraid that the La Moussayes were going to spread the Protestant faith, construction commenced slowly and was stopped altogether in 1666. The, by then impoverished, La Moussayes, sold their unfinished castle to Guy-Aldonce de Durfort, Marshal de Lorge, in 1681.

Durfort descendants, who changed his family name into Lorge, then had the stables built by the La Moussayes initially rebuilt into a manor during the 18th century. Later however Quintin Castle was abandoned and only home to an intendant and some officers. In 1775 the castle passed to the Choiseul family through marriage. 

During the French Revolution, at the end of the 18th century, the 17th century tower was used as a prison and salpeter was manufactured in its cellars. Through inheritance the castle ended up in the possession of its present owners; the Bagneux family.

So the present castle buildings were originally the stables of the 17th century castle. The 17th century faceted corner tower and its subterranean basement galleries now stand empty and are being slowly restored with the purpose of making them visitable again.

At present Quintin Castle can be visited for a small fee. It is still private property. Sadly enough it had not yet opened when I came by. The visitable parts of the castle however are just its gardens and the 18th century castle. A curious ensemble.


Gallery