Prandegg Castle

Prandegg Castle, locally known as Burg Prandegg, lies east of the village of Gutau, in the province of Upper Austria in Austria.

Prandegg Castle was first mentioned in 1287. The ownership of Prandegg was a peculiar one; one half belonged to the Episcopacy of Regensburg, the other half was a princely fief. In the early 13th century the Regensburg half came into the possession of the Pranter family. In 1298 the Pranter' half was divided between Haug von Reichenstein and Ulrich von Capellen. The princely fief was then owned by Wernhard von Russbach. Ulrich and his descendants managed to acquire the princely fief in 1300 and in 1352 the Reichenstein part.

The Von Capellen family then held Prandegg Castle as one until 1406. Then they died out and it was again divided, to be a dowry for the last 2 daughters. So through marriage it came into the possession of the House of Dagsberg and House of Liechtenstein. In 1492 one half was given to Hilleprant Jörger, who acquired the other half 2 years later. The Jörgers were apparently quite rich as they bought lots of lands and rights in the area in the decades that followed. They mostly resided in Zellhof Castle and used Prandegg as their second home or to recieve guests.

During the Thirty Years' War, the Jörger family were self-proclaimed Protestants and thus were forced to sell all their belongings to Gotthard von Scherffenberg, Lord of Spielberg, in 1631. Von Scherffenberg however choose to reside in Zellhof Castle rather than Prandegg. Gotthard died soon after and his widow married Hans Reichard von Starhemberg. He also preferred Zellhof over Prandegg.

Von Starhemberg sold the castle to the Salburger family in 1642. By then Prandegg Castle had already fallen into decline. Only a brewery and a tavern in the bailey were continued but later also abandoned.

The ruined castle passed through several hands until 1832 when it was sold to the Dukes of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. Their descendants still own the castle.

At present Prandegg Castle can be visited during opening hours. There is a small fee for a guided tour. A great castle ruin in a wooded area.


Gallery

Prandegg Castle

Prandegg Castle, locally known as Burg Prandegg, lies east of the village of Gutau, in the province of Upper Austria in Austria.

Prandegg Castle was first mentioned in 1287. The ownership of Prandegg was a peculiar one; one half belonged to the Episcopacy of Regensburg, the other half was a princely fief. In the early 13th century the Regensburg half came into the possession of the Pranter family. In 1298 the Pranter' half was divided between Haug von Reichenstein and Ulrich von Capellen. The princely fief was then owned by Wernhard von Russbach. Ulrich and his descendants managed to acquire the princely fief in 1300 and in 1352 the Reichenstein part.

The Von Capellen family then held Prandegg Castle as one until 1406. Then they died out and it was again divided, to be a dowry for the last 2 daughters. So through marriage it came into the possession of the House of Dagsberg and House of Liechtenstein. In 1492 one half was given to Hilleprant Jörger, who acquired the other half 2 years later. The Jörgers were apparently quite rich as they bought lots of lands and rights in the area in the decades that followed. They mostly resided in Zellhof Castle and used Prandegg as their second home or to recieve guests.

During the Thirty Years' War, the Jörger family were self-proclaimed Protestants and thus were forced to sell all their belongings to Gotthard von Scherffenberg, Lord of Spielberg, in 1631. Von Scherffenberg however choose to reside in Zellhof Castle rather than Prandegg. Gotthard died soon after and his widow married Hans Reichard von Starhemberg. He also preferred Zellhof over Prandegg.

Von Starhemberg sold the castle to the Salburger family in 1642. By then Prandegg Castle had already fallen into decline. Only a brewery and a tavern in the bailey were continued but later also abandoned.

The ruined castle passed through several hands until 1832 when it was sold to the Dukes of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. Their descendants still own the castle.

At present Prandegg Castle can be visited during opening hours. There is a small fee for a guided tour. A great castle ruin in a wooded area.


Gallery