St. Pierre-du-Mont Castle

St. Pierre-du-Mont Castle, locally known as Château de St. Pierre-du-Mont or more simply as Château St. Pierre, lies near the village of Saint Pierre-du-Mont, in the Calvados department in France.

St. Pierre-du-Mont Castle dates back to the 16th century. Its entrance gate, flanked on the right by a machicolated defensive tower, is typical of the fortified gates which guarded Norman manors at the end of the 16th century. The upper part of that tower once housed a dovecote, which was a symbol of nobility until the Revolution.

At the beginning of the 17th century, the estate belonged to Francois du Mesnil. His family, like many noble families of that time, followed the reformed religion. Shortly after the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes (1685) they returned to Catholicism.

At the end of the 18th century St. Pierre-du-Mont Castle passed through marriage to the De Frotté family. One member of this family, who was a Marquess, was a prefect during the first half of the 19th century.

At present the castle is used as a Bed and Breakfast. It is also very close to the Pointe du Hoc, a famous site of World War II. So close even that it is remarkable that it wasn't destroyed during the bombings. A nice castle in which I would like to have stayed.


Gallery

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St. Pierre-du-Mont Castle

St. Pierre-du-Mont Castle, locally known as Château de St. Pierre-du-Mont or more simply as Château St. Pierre, lies near the village of Saint Pierre-du-Mont, in the Calvados department in France.

St. Pierre-du-Mont Castle dates back to the 16th century. Its entrance gate, flanked on the right by a machicolated defensive tower, is typical of the fortified gates which guarded Norman manors at the end of the 16th century. The upper part of that tower once housed a dovecote, which was a symbol of nobility until the Revolution.

At the beginning of the 17th century, the estate belonged to Francois du Mesnil. His family, like many noble families of that time, followed the reformed religion. Shortly after the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes (1685) they returned to Catholicism.

At the end of the 18th century St. Pierre-du-Mont Castle passed through marriage to the De Frotté family. One member of this family, who was a Marquess, was a prefect during the first half of the 19th century.

At present the castle is used as a Bed and Breakfast. It is also very close to the Pointe du Hoc, a famous site of World War II. So close even that it is remarkable that it wasn't destroyed during the bombings. A nice castle in which I would like to have stayed.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://castles.nl/pierremont-castle#sigFreeId5356e8eecc