Pettingen Castle

Pettingen Castle, locally known as Château de Pettingen, lies in the village of the same name, north of the town of Mersch in Luxembourg.

The first fortification at this site was known as Pittigero Mazini, from the 10th century on. I have not been able to find out where that name came from. It has an Italian sound to it. So if you know more; please contact me. During the 13th century this name changed to Pettingen or Pittingen.

During the Early Middle Ages the Lords of Pettingen were important members of the Luxembourg nobility. In the beginning of the 14th century Arnold II, Lord of Pittingen married Margarete von Roussy. Their son Arnold the Younger, had a daughter by the name of Irmengard. She married with Johann von Criechingen in the second half of the 14th century thus combining the dominion of Pettingen with that of Larochette Castle, owned by the Criechingen family. This family is also known under its French name Créhange.

In the 15th century a grandchild of Johann von Criechingen, also named Johann, had sided with René II, Duke of Lorrain in his war against Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy. This resulted in a siege of Pettingen Castle which destroyed the castle. In 1494 all the possessions of the Criechingen family were confiscated.

In 1503 half of the confiscated possessions were returned to the son of Johann and a new castle was built on the old foundations. It are the remains of that castle that we see today. It was built as a square stronghold with four, round corner towers and a square keep in the middle. Originally the castle would have been circled by a wide moat, watered by the Alzette stream nearby.

In 1684 Pettingen Castle was severely damaged by cannon fire by the troops of the French King Louis XIV. It was only partially rebuilt.

Ownership of the castle changed hands several times in later centuries and between 1850 and 1920 the castle fell to ruin. The ruins of Pettingen Castle are owned by the state since 1947.

This nice castle ruin is freely accessible and seems to be used for cultural activities now and then. It can also be seen from the train line running between the north of the country and the capital; Luxembourg, which runs very close to the castle on its east side.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://castles.nl/pettingen-castle#sigFreeId1648c8c810

Pettingen Castle

Pettingen Castle, locally known as Château de Pettingen, lies in the village of the same name, north of the town of Mersch in Luxembourg.

The first fortification at this site was known as Pittigero Mazini, from the 10th century on. I have not been able to find out where that name came from. It has an Italian sound to it. So if you know more; please contact me. During the 13th century this name changed to Pettingen or Pittingen.

During the Early Middle Ages the Lords of Pettingen were important members of the Luxembourg nobility. In the beginning of the 14th century Arnold II, Lord of Pittingen married Margarete von Roussy. Their son Arnold the Younger, had a daughter by the name of Irmengard. She married with Johann von Criechingen in the second half of the 14th century thus combining the dominion of Pettingen with that of Larochette Castle, owned by the Criechingen family. This family is also known under its French name Créhange.

In the 15th century a grandchild of Johann von Criechingen, also named Johann, had sided with René II, Duke of Lorrain in his war against Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy. This resulted in a siege of Pettingen Castle which destroyed the castle. In 1494 all the possessions of the Criechingen family were confiscated.

In 1503 half of the confiscated possessions were returned to the son of Johann and a new castle was built on the old foundations. It are the remains of that castle that we see today. It was built as a square stronghold with four, round corner towers and a square keep in the middle. Originally the castle would have been circled by a wide moat, watered by the Alzette stream nearby.

In 1684 Pettingen Castle was severely damaged by cannon fire by the troops of the French King Louis XIV. It was only partially rebuilt.

Ownership of the castle changed hands several times in later centuries and between 1850 and 1920 the castle fell to ruin. The ruins of Pettingen Castle are owned by the state since 1947.

This nice castle ruin is freely accessible and seems to be used for cultural activities now and then. It can also be seen from the train line running between the north of the country and the capital; Luxembourg, which runs very close to the castle on its east side.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://castles.nl/pettingen-castle#sigFreeId1648c8c810