The Old Barracks

The Old Barracks lies in the town of Cahersiveen, in County Kerry in Ireland.

The Old Barracks was built between 1870 and 1875 by the British Government as a Royal Irish Constabulary Barracks by the architect Enoch Trevor-Owen, in the style of a German Schloss.

Local tradition has it that stone from the original Sive Stone Fort nearby was used in its construction. Local tradition also tells that the British authorities were so anxious to get it built that its building plans were mixed up with that of a police station intended for the Punjab in India. The R.I.C. barrack at Ballyduff, Co. Waterford, carries a similar story. It is situated on a commanding position next to the bridge over the Fertha River.

The RIC here was meant to not only maintain law and order in the town but mainly to protect the telegraph cable station on nearby Valentia Island. Because the British and American Magnetic Telegraph Company had successfully laid a telegraph cable across the Atlantic ocean from Valentia Island to Newfoundland, in 1866, connecting Europe and America for the first time. And with the defeated Fenian Rising of 1867 still fresh in their mind the British Government wanted to prevent the station falling into wrong hands in a future uprising.

The Barracks remained an important police station up to the Irish Civil War. During this period Cahersiveen was seen as a republican stronghold and with the Free State Army encroaching, the residents of the town did not want such a commanding building falling into the hands of the army so The Barracks was burned down in August 1922.

The burnt out building stayed derelict for the next 70 years before it was restored to its present condition between 1992 and 1996. It now houses a Heritage Centre and a Local History Museum.

The Old Barracks is a nice castle-like building. The reconstructed Sive Stone Fort is near and across the river are Cahergall Stone Fort, Leacanabuaile Stone Fort, and the ruin of Ballycarbery Castle. All in all a great area to visit.


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The Old Barracks

The Old Barracks lies in the town of Cahersiveen, in County Kerry in Ireland.

The Old Barracks was built between 1870 and 1875 by the British Government as a Royal Irish Constabulary Barracks by the architect Enoch Trevor-Owen, in the style of a German Schloss.

Local tradition has it that stone from the original Sive Stone Fort nearby was used in its construction. Local tradition also tells that the British authorities were so anxious to get it built that its building plans were mixed up with that of a police station intended for the Punjab in India. The R.I.C. barrack at Ballyduff, Co. Waterford, carries a similar story. It is situated on a commanding position next to the bridge over the Fertha River.

The RIC here was meant to not only maintain law and order in the town but mainly to protect the telegraph cable station on nearby Valentia Island. Because the British and American Magnetic Telegraph Company had successfully laid a telegraph cable across the Atlantic ocean from Valentia Island to Newfoundland, in 1866, connecting Europe and America for the first time. And with the defeated Fenian Rising of 1867 still fresh in their mind the British Government wanted to prevent the station falling into wrong hands in a future uprising.

The Barracks remained an important police station up to the Irish Civil War. During this period Cahersiveen was seen as a republican stronghold and with the Free State Army encroaching, the residents of the town did not want such a commanding building falling into the hands of the army so The Barracks was burned down in August 1922.

The burnt out building stayed derelict for the next 70 years before it was restored to its present condition between 1992 and 1996. It now houses a Heritage Centre and a Local History Museum.

The Old Barracks is a nice castle-like building. The reconstructed Sive Stone Fort is near and across the river are Cahergall Stone Fort, Leacanabuaile Stone Fort, and the ruin of Ballycarbery Castle. All in all a great area to visit.


Gallery