Nederhemert Castle

Nederhemert Castle, locally known as Kasteel Nederhemert, lies north of the hamlet of Nederhemert-Zuid, in the province of Gelderland in the Netherlands.

When Nederhemert Castle was founded, around 1300, it started out as a big square tower house situated on a small island in the Meuse river. It was first mentioned in 1310 when Jan van Hemert pledged his castle to the Duke of Guelders.

Later, during the 2nd quarter of the 14th century, a walled courtyard was added with a rectangular tower at the north east corner and a round tower at the north west corner. At that time the gate was situated at the east side of the castle. In 1350 a knights hall was added. During the 15th century another, hexagonal, tower was added to the south west corner.

Townspeople from the town of 's-Hertogenbosch partially destroyed the castle in 1475. It was repaired and its entrance was replaced to the west side of the castle. Later also the courtyard was roofed over.

In 1546 Nederhemert Castle went to the Torck family. The castle then led a relatively calm existence and passed through the hands of several owners during the next centuries; the Von Quadt family (1655), the Van Vittinghof named Schell family (1697), the Van Lynden family (1726), the Bentinck family (1791), the Van Nagell family (1814), the Van Kretschmar family (1880) and the Van Wassenaer family (1920).

During the 19th century the westside of the castle had been redesigned and given a Neo-Gothic appearance. Disaster struck the castle at the end of World War II when around New Years Eve 1944 it was situated in the frontline. Due to the fighting it was damaged and burned down. Only some walls were left standing. The next decades the ruin disintegrated and several parts collapsed. The Van Wassenaer family sold the ruined castle to the Dutch State in 1957. It remained a ruin until 2001 when a partial restoration campaign started which was completed in 2005.

At present Nederhemert Castle is used as an office by a tech company and also as a wedding venue on Saturdays. It can only be visited on National Heritage Days. A very nice restored castle.


Gallery

Nederhemert Castle

Nederhemert Castle, locally known as Kasteel Nederhemert, lies north of the hamlet of Nederhemert-Zuid, in the province of Gelderland in the Netherlands.

When Nederhemert Castle was founded, around 1300, it started out as a big square tower house situated on a small island in the Meuse river. It was first mentioned in 1310 when Jan van Hemert pledged his castle to the Duke of Guelders.

Later, during the 2nd quarter of the 14th century, a walled courtyard was added with a rectangular tower at the north east corner and a round tower at the north west corner. At that time the gate was situated at the east side of the castle. In 1350 a knights hall was added. During the 15th century another, hexagonal, tower was added to the south west corner.

Townspeople from the town of 's-Hertogenbosch partially destroyed the castle in 1475. It was repaired and its entrance was replaced to the west side of the castle. Later also the courtyard was roofed over.

In 1546 Nederhemert Castle went to the Torck family. The castle then led a relatively calm existence and passed through the hands of several owners during the next centuries; the Von Quadt family (1655), the Van Vittinghof named Schell family (1697), the Van Lynden family (1726), the Bentinck family (1791), the Van Nagell family (1814), the Van Kretschmar family (1880) and the Van Wassenaer family (1920).

During the 19th century the westside of the castle had been redesigned and given a Neo-Gothic appearance. Disaster struck the castle at the end of World War II when around New Years Eve 1944 it was situated in the frontline. Due to the fighting it was damaged and burned down. Only some walls were left standing. The next decades the ruin disintegrated and several parts collapsed. The Van Wassenaer family sold the ruined castle to the Dutch State in 1957. It remained a ruin until 2001 when a partial restoration campaign started which was completed in 2005.

At present Nederhemert Castle is used as an office by a tech company and also as a wedding venue on Saturdays. It can only be visited on National Heritage Days. A very nice restored castle.


Gallery