Mousson Castle

Mousson Castle, locally known as Château de Mousson lies on a hill above the village of the same name, in the Meurthe-et-Moselle department in France.

Between 1040 and 1073 Mousson Castle was built on a hill, formerly occupied by a Gallo-Roman temple dedicated to the goddess Diane. The castle was built by Louis I of Mousson, Count of Bar to oppose the episcopal power of the Bishop of Verdun, who owned Dieulouard Castle on the other side of the Moselle river. At the same time the village was walled.

From the castle's position the Count of Bar could see Prény Castle (property of the Duke of Lorraine), Dieulouard Castle (property of the Bishop of Verdun) and Nomeny Castle (property of the Bishop of Metz).

Reginald I, Count of Bar, improved the castle in the early 12th century. Because of Reginald's aggressive policies Mousson Castle was besieged by Henry V, Holy Roman Emperor, in 1113. At the end of the 12th century the Counts of Bar didn't reside in the castle anymore and care of the castle was given to a bailiff.

In 1230 the castle was damaged by the troops of Matthias II, Duke of Lorraine.

During the 14th and 15th century Mousson Castle was besieged several times by the duchies of Lorraine and Burgundy and the people of Metz. At some point is was apparently taken by the Duchy of Lorraine because Antoine, Duke of Lorraine in the first part of the 16th century, had the castle restored.

In the 17th century Mousson Castle, a symbol of the spirit of independence of the people of Lorraine against the power of royal France, was an obstacle to the centralising designs of Louis XIII of France and Cardinal Richelieu. So, in 1633, following the example of many castles in the region, Richelieu had the castle dismantled. The actual work was carried out by the inhabitants of the region, acting under the constraint of French troops. The castle remained a ruin afterwards.

In 1944 the castle ruin and the village were almost obliterated by American artillery bombing German positions.

At present Mousson Castle can freely be visited. Of the actual castle not much remains apart from a few walls with little architectural detail. But still a nice site too visit.


Gallery

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Mousson Castle

Mousson Castle, locally known as Château de Mousson lies on a hill above the village of the same name, in the Meurthe-et-Moselle department in France.

Between 1040 and 1073 Mousson Castle was built on a hill, formerly occupied by a Gallo-Roman temple dedicated to the goddess Diane. The castle was built by Louis I of Mousson, Count of Bar to oppose the episcopal power of the Bishop of Verdun, who owned Dieulouard Castle on the other side of the Moselle river. At the same time the village was walled.

From the castle's position the Count of Bar could see Prény Castle (property of the Duke of Lorraine), Dieulouard Castle (property of the Bishop of Verdun) and Nomeny Castle (property of the Bishop of Metz).

Reginald I, Count of Bar, improved the castle in the early 12th century. Because of Reginald's aggressive policies Mousson Castle was besieged by Henry V, Holy Roman Emperor, in 1113. At the end of the 12th century the Counts of Bar didn't reside in the castle anymore and care of the castle was given to a bailiff.

In 1230 the castle was damaged by the troops of Matthias II, Duke of Lorraine.

During the 14th and 15th century Mousson Castle was besieged several times by the duchies of Lorraine and Burgundy and the people of Metz. At some point is was apparently taken by the Duchy of Lorraine because Antoine, Duke of Lorraine in the first part of the 16th century, had the castle restored.

In the 17th century Mousson Castle, a symbol of the spirit of independence of the people of Lorraine against the power of royal France, was an obstacle to the centralising designs of Louis XIII of France and Cardinal Richelieu. So, in 1633, following the example of many castles in the region, Richelieu had the castle dismantled. The actual work was carried out by the inhabitants of the region, acting under the constraint of French troops. The castle remained a ruin afterwards.

In 1944 the castle ruin and the village were almost obliterated by American artillery bombing German positions.

At present Mousson Castle can freely be visited. Of the actual castle not much remains apart from a few walls with little architectural detail. But still a nice site too visit.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://castles.nl/mousson-castle#sigFreeIdfc1f2afb2c