Monleon Castle

Monleon Castle lies, in the village by the same name, in the province of Salamanca in Spain.

Located at the western end of the village, next to a steep area that dominates the confluence of the Carnicero stream with the Alagón river, this is another stately castle raised in the 15 century, which is part of the defensive walls that surround the village.

Its groundplan is an irregular trapeze, with the keep in the middle. The north and east wall of the enclosure are built later than the others, to obtain a fortified perimeter that defended the tower from inside the village. The square keep is made up of large granite blocks reinforced with ashlar masonry at its corners. The top is fitted with 8 turrets. In medieval times the keep could be accessed on the second floorlevel by means of a removable stair or drawbridge. Its interior was fitted with 5 floors.

Although the village of Monleón is mentioned in a letter from queen Doña Berenguela, in 1199, the year of its repopulation is probably 1215. Its walls, with some fortified inner enclosure, would date from this year.

The first mention of the castle is from 1306 in a Cathedral File in which the council and town hall of Salamanca agree that its inhabitants were exempted from contributions to support the University of Salamanca.

In 1477 the castle was besieged by the troops of King Fernando the Catholic. The reason for this was that its lord; a Salamancan knight, Don Bernardo Maldonado the Tyrant, had been manufacturing false currency amongst other crimes that caused great damage to the surrounding territories.

This castle is one of my favorites, mainly because of its appearance; dark walls with lighter corners and the many turrets. It is situated in a very little and quiet, walled village where time seems to have stood still. There's a nice walk, indicated with signs, through the village. Too bad it's not accessible.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://castles.nl/monleon-castle#sigFreeIda9bedcf33c

Monleon Castle

Monleon Castle lies, in the village by the same name, in the province of Salamanca in Spain.

Located at the western end of the village, next to a steep area that dominates the confluence of the Carnicero stream with the Alagón river, this is another stately castle raised in the 15 century, which is part of the defensive walls that surround the village.

Its groundplan is an irregular trapeze, with the keep in the middle. The north and east wall of the enclosure are built later than the others, to obtain a fortified perimeter that defended the tower from inside the village. The square keep is made up of large granite blocks reinforced with ashlar masonry at its corners. The top is fitted with 8 turrets. In medieval times the keep could be accessed on the second floorlevel by means of a removable stair or drawbridge. Its interior was fitted with 5 floors.

Although the village of Monleón is mentioned in a letter from queen Doña Berenguela, in 1199, the year of its repopulation is probably 1215. Its walls, with some fortified inner enclosure, would date from this year.

The first mention of the castle is from 1306 in a Cathedral File in which the council and town hall of Salamanca agree that its inhabitants were exempted from contributions to support the University of Salamanca.

In 1477 the castle was besieged by the troops of King Fernando the Catholic. The reason for this was that its lord; a Salamancan knight, Don Bernardo Maldonado the Tyrant, had been manufacturing false currency amongst other crimes that caused great damage to the surrounding territories.

This castle is one of my favorites, mainly because of its appearance; dark walls with lighter corners and the many turrets. It is situated in a very little and quiet, walled village where time seems to have stood still. There's a nice walk, indicated with signs, through the village. Too bad it's not accessible.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://castles.nl/monleon-castle#sigFreeIda9bedcf33c