Monkstown Castle

Monkstown Castle lies in the village of Monkstown in County Cork in Ireland.

Monkstown Castle is a semi-fortified stronghouse built in 1636 by Anastacia Archdeacon (nee Gould) as a present for her husband John Archdeacon. John was returning from his campaign in Spain, where he was fighting with King Philip. The story goes that on returning from his campaign, John Archdeacon entered Cork harbour and on seeing the newly erected fortification he thought that the enemy had taken over the headland. He proceeded to fire directly at the building. Luckily only one canon ball hit the battlements and destroyed only some of the stone work.

The descendants of John and Anastacia continued to occupy Monkstown Castle until the Cromwellian period, when the castle was occupied by Captain Thomas Plunkett on behalf of the Parliamentarians. At the end of the war Cromwell deprived the Archdeacons of their castle and lands because they sided with James II. The castle was subsequently handed over to a Colonel Huncks. He sold the castle to Primate Michael Boyle, Archbishop of Armagh and Lord Chancellor of Ireland. In the late 17th century, on Boyle's death, the property reverted to his granddaughter who married Sir Thomas Versey.

The castle was later occupied by John Callaghan in the 1770s and at the start of the 19th century the Shaw family took up residence at Monkstown Castle. Bernard Shaw renovated the building.

During the Peninsular war from 1808-1814 Monkstown Castle was used as military barracks and accommodated up to 450 soldiers.

In the 20th century the building was used as a clubhouse; first by the Monkstown Badminton Club and, from 1908 on, by the Monkstown Golf Club. It was abandoned when the club build a new clubhouse in 1971. In 2007 it was bought by a private couple and a restoration started, which still seems to be going on.

Monkstown Castle bears a big resemblance to Mountlong Castle suggesting that the two properties may have been designed and constructed by the same builder. It consists of a rectangular main block with four, boldly projecting, square corner towers.

A very nice castle which was nicely restored. I am curious how they restored the interior. I don't know its future use nor if its interior can be visited.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
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Monkstown Castle

Monkstown Castle lies in the village of Monkstown in County Cork in Ireland.

Monkstown Castle is a semi-fortified stronghouse built in 1636 by Anastacia Archdeacon (nee Gould) as a present for her husband John Archdeacon. John was returning from his campaign in Spain, where he was fighting with King Philip. The story goes that on returning from his campaign, John Archdeacon entered Cork harbour and on seeing the newly erected fortification he thought that the enemy had taken over the headland. He proceeded to fire directly at the building. Luckily only one canon ball hit the battlements and destroyed only some of the stone work.

The descendants of John and Anastacia continued to occupy Monkstown Castle until the Cromwellian period, when the castle was occupied by Captain Thomas Plunkett on behalf of the Parliamentarians. At the end of the war Cromwell deprived the Archdeacons of their castle and lands because they sided with James II. The castle was subsequently handed over to a Colonel Huncks. He sold the castle to Primate Michael Boyle, Archbishop of Armagh and Lord Chancellor of Ireland. In the late 17th century, on Boyle's death, the property reverted to his granddaughter who married Sir Thomas Versey.

The castle was later occupied by John Callaghan in the 1770s and at the start of the 19th century the Shaw family took up residence at Monkstown Castle. Bernard Shaw renovated the building.

During the Peninsular war from 1808-1814 Monkstown Castle was used as military barracks and accommodated up to 450 soldiers.

In the 20th century the building was used as a clubhouse; first by the Monkstown Badminton Club and, from 1908 on, by the Monkstown Golf Club. It was abandoned when the club build a new clubhouse in 1971. In 2007 it was bought by a private couple and a restoration started, which still seems to be going on.

Monkstown Castle bears a big resemblance to Mountlong Castle suggesting that the two properties may have been designed and constructed by the same builder. It consists of a rectangular main block with four, boldly projecting, square corner towers.

A very nice castle which was nicely restored. I am curious how they restored the interior. I don't know its future use nor if its interior can be visited.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://castles.nl/monkstown-castle#sigFreeId117a2b75f4