St. Malo Castle

St. Malo Castle, locally known as Château de Saint-Malo and sometimes as Château de la Duchesse Anne, lies in the city of the same name, in the Ille-et-Vilaine department in France.

Construction of St. Malo Castle started in 1424 by John V, Duke of Brittany, with the purpose of ensuring his hold over the town of Saint-Malo. John began by building a D-shaped keep at the east corner of the walled island town where an isthmus was the only crossing point between the town and the mainland at that time. His keep incorporated a part of the 14th century town walls and a wall tower.

In 1475 Francis II, Duke of Brittany, had a massive round tower, called La Générale, built next to the keep. His daughter Anne, Duchess of Brittany from 1488 and queen consort of France, added the Quic-en-Groigne Tower between 1498 and 1501. Two other towers, called the Mill Tower and the Tower of the Ladies were added in later years. Together with the curtain walls this gave the castle a somewhat square ground plan.

In 1590, the castle was stormed by the people of Saint-Malo who wanted to prevent the governor from handing over the city to the supporters of the Protestant king Henri IV.

During the 17th century a bastion of triangular shape was added at the east side of the castle. At the end of that century Sébastien Le Prestre de Vauban, the famous military engineer, inspected the fortifications of Saint-Malo for Louis XIV of France. Deciding it needed strengthening he modified the town and castle ramparts to mount artillery. Also 2 barracks were built within the castle walls.

In the beginning of the French Revolution St. Malo Castle was stormed by the people of the town and the curtain wall between the La Générale and Quic-en-Groigne towers was torn down. In 1792 they stormed it again.

The castle became a barracks in the 19th century, a function it would serve until 1921. A museum was installed in part of the castle in 1927. The old barracks are now used as the city hall.

At present St. Malo Castle can not be visited. The museum it houses is being renovated and it is expected to open again in 2022. Too bad, I am very curious about its interior. A very nice castle. The beautiful walled city of Saint-Malo with its several forts (amongst which Fort National and Fort Petit-Bé) is very much worth your visit. Recommended! Fort Aleth and the Solidor Tower, both opposite Saint-Malo, are also nearby.


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St. Malo Castle

St. Malo Castle, locally known as Château de Saint-Malo and sometimes as Château de la Duchesse Anne, lies in the city of the same name, in the Ille-et-Vilaine department in France.

Construction of St. Malo Castle started in 1424 by John V, Duke of Brittany, with the purpose of ensuring his hold over the town of Saint-Malo. John began by building a D-shaped keep at the east corner of the walled island town where an isthmus was the only crossing point between the town and the mainland at that time. His keep incorporated a part of the 14th century town walls and a wall tower.

In 1475 Francis II, Duke of Brittany, had a massive round tower, called La Générale, built next to the keep. His daughter Anne, Duchess of Brittany from 1488 and queen consort of France, added the Quic-en-Groigne Tower between 1498 and 1501. Two other towers, called the Mill Tower and the Tower of the Ladies were added in later years. Together with the curtain walls this gave the castle a somewhat square ground plan.

In 1590, the castle was stormed by the people of Saint-Malo who wanted to prevent the governor from handing over the city to the supporters of the Protestant king Henri IV.

During the 17th century a bastion of triangular shape was added at the east side of the castle. At the end of that century Sébastien Le Prestre de Vauban, the famous military engineer, inspected the fortifications of Saint-Malo for Louis XIV of France. Deciding it needed strengthening he modified the town and castle ramparts to mount artillery. Also 2 barracks were built within the castle walls.

In the beginning of the French Revolution St. Malo Castle was stormed by the people of the town and the curtain wall between the La Générale and Quic-en-Groigne towers was torn down. In 1792 they stormed it again.

The castle became a barracks in the 19th century, a function it would serve until 1921. A museum was installed in part of the castle in 1927. The old barracks are now used as the city hall.

At present St. Malo Castle can not be visited. The museum it houses is being renovated and it is expected to open again in 2022. Too bad, I am very curious about its interior. A very nice castle. The beautiful walled city of Saint-Malo with its several forts (amongst which Fort National and Fort Petit-Bé) is very much worth your visit. Recommended! Fort Aleth and the Solidor Tower, both opposite Saint-Malo, are also nearby.


Gallery