Macroom Castle

Macroom Castle lies in the center of the town of Macroom, in County Cork in Ireland.

Macroom Castle was probably built during the 12th century by the O'Flynn family. It guarded a bridge over the River Sullane. Later it was owned by the MacCarthys, Lords of Muskerry. In 1565 the castle was restored and enlarged.

In 1602 the castle was sieged. It caught fire and the then owner, Cormac McDermot Carthy, Lord Muskerry was arrested. During the rebellion of 1641, Donough MacCarthy, 2nd Viscount Muskerry was visited at the castle by the Papal Nuncio, who stayed for 4 days. In 1650 Boetius MacEgan, Bishop of Ross, assembled a Confederation army at the castle, but when the Cromwellian troops arrived, the castle garrison again set fire to the building before joining the rebel army in the castle park. During the ensuing battle the Bishop and the High Sheriff of Kerry were taken prisoners and later killed. Later in the war Macroom Castle was said to have been burned yet again by General Ireton.

Later Macroom Castle was given to Admiral Sir William Penn, the father of the founder of the state of Pennsylvania, USA. At the restoration of the Monarchy it was restored to the McCarthys, who further enlarged and renovated it. In 1691 the castle estate was confiscated from Donough MacCarthy, 4th Earl of Clancarty for his allegiance to King James II and the castle sold by auction in 1703. It was acquired by the Hollow Sword Blade Co., who resold it to Judge Bernard. It then passed to the Hedges Eyre family and afterwards to Lord Ardilaun.

Macroom Castle was burned for the last time in 1922, following the evacuation of British Auxiliaries from the town, by anti-treaty forces. In 1924 it was sold to a group of local businessmen. Finally in 1967 it was largely demolished.

The castle grounds are now occupied by a technical school.

It looks like a nice ruin. Too bad it can not be entered as it is largely built in by modern buildings.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
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Macroom Castle

Macroom Castle lies in the center of the town of Macroom, in County Cork in Ireland.

Macroom Castle was probably built during the 12th century by the O'Flynn family. It guarded a bridge over the River Sullane. Later it was owned by the MacCarthys, Lords of Muskerry. In 1565 the castle was restored and enlarged.

In 1602 the castle was sieged. It caught fire and the then owner, Cormac McDermot Carthy, Lord Muskerry was arrested. During the rebellion of 1641, Donough MacCarthy, 2nd Viscount Muskerry was visited at the castle by the Papal Nuncio, who stayed for 4 days. In 1650 Boetius MacEgan, Bishop of Ross, assembled a Confederation army at the castle, but when the Cromwellian troops arrived, the castle garrison again set fire to the building before joining the rebel army in the castle park. During the ensuing battle the Bishop and the High Sheriff of Kerry were taken prisoners and later killed. Later in the war Macroom Castle was said to have been burned yet again by General Ireton.

Later Macroom Castle was given to Admiral Sir William Penn, the father of the founder of the state of Pennsylvania, USA. At the restoration of the Monarchy it was restored to the McCarthys, who further enlarged and renovated it. In 1691 the castle estate was confiscated from Donough MacCarthy, 4th Earl of Clancarty for his allegiance to King James II and the castle sold by auction in 1703. It was acquired by the Hollow Sword Blade Co., who resold it to Judge Bernard. It then passed to the Hedges Eyre family and afterwards to Lord Ardilaun.

Macroom Castle was burned for the last time in 1922, following the evacuation of British Auxiliaries from the town, by anti-treaty forces. In 1924 it was sold to a group of local businessmen. Finally in 1967 it was largely demolished.

The castle grounds are now occupied by a technical school.

It looks like a nice ruin. Too bad it can not be entered as it is largely built in by modern buildings.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://castles.nl/macroom-castle#sigFreeId0df1591e17