Linden Castle

Linden Castle, locally known as Burgruine Linden, lies next to the village of the same name, in the Bavaria region in Germany.

Linden Castle was built somewhere during the 12th century by the Counts of Bogen. Later it came into the hands of the House of Wittelsbach. Albert IV of Wittelsbach, Duke of Bavaria, exchanged ownership of the castle with Konrad von Nu├čberg for Konrad's half ownership of Neunussberg Castle, in 1470.

Later the castle passed to the Lords of Degenberg. They had acquired the monopoly for the brewing of wheat beer, from the Bavarian Duke, and in 1553 started the first brewery of wheat beer in Bavaria in the castle.

In 1602 the Lords of Degenberg died out and Linden Castle again came into the possession of the House of Wittelsbach. And even though they installed a bailiff in the castle it fell into dilapidation. In 1641, during the Thirty Years' War, the castle was burned down by Swedish troops. In 1761 it was acquired by a commoner after which it fell to ruin.

Originally the castle was surrounded by a moat. At present only a consolidated part of the keep and traces of the moat remain.

At present Linden Castle can freely be visited externally. Not a very interesting castle remnant as it lacks architectural detail.


Gallery

Linden Castle

Linden Castle, locally known as Burgruine Linden, lies next to the village of the same name, in the Bavaria region in Germany.

Linden Castle was built somewhere during the 12th century by the Counts of Bogen. Later it came into the hands of the House of Wittelsbach. Albert IV of Wittelsbach, Duke of Bavaria, exchanged ownership of the castle with Konrad von Nu├čberg for Konrad's half ownership of Neunussberg Castle, in 1470.

Later the castle passed to the Lords of Degenberg. They had acquired the monopoly for the brewing of wheat beer, from the Bavarian Duke, and in 1553 started the first brewery of wheat beer in Bavaria in the castle.

In 1602 the Lords of Degenberg died out and Linden Castle again came into the possession of the House of Wittelsbach. And even though they installed a bailiff in the castle it fell into dilapidation. In 1641, during the Thirty Years' War, the castle was burned down by Swedish troops. In 1761 it was acquired by a commoner after which it fell to ruin.

Originally the castle was surrounded by a moat. At present only a consolidated part of the keep and traces of the moat remain.

At present Linden Castle can freely be visited externally. Not a very interesting castle remnant as it lacks architectural detail.


Gallery