Largoët Castle

Largoët Castle, locally known as Forteresse de Largoët or Tours d'Elven, lies in a wood west of the village of Elven, in the Morbihan department in France.

A castle at this site was first mentioned in 1020 as a possession of Derrien I, Lord of Elven.

In 1237 Largoët Castle went to the Malestroit family by marriage. During the War of the Breton Succession, in the mid-14th century, the castle was disputed by the House of Blois and the House of Montfort.

In 1463 it came into possession of the Rieux family. Between 1474 and 1476 Jean IV de Rieux harbored Henry Tudor, the future Henry VII of England, in the castle. It is said Henry stayed in a room in the keep. In 1490 the castle was dismantled by Charles VIII of France when his army invaded the Duchy of Brittany to force Anne of Brittany to marry him. She did but later had the castle restored.

In 1656 the castle was bought by Nicolas Fouquet, who was Superintendant of Finances of France under King Louis XIV. After Fouquet's death, his widow sold it to Michel de Trémeurec, an adviser to the Parliament of Brittany. The castle was never sold again but passed through several families by marriage.

In the 19th century, it was proposed to demolish Largoët Castle, given its dilapidation, but it was saved thanks to Prosper Mérimée, a French writer, who had it classed as a monument in 1862.

The present ruins are from a castle built between the 13th and 15th century. These ruins now mainly consist of a 14th century octagonal keep of 45 meters high, making it one of the highest existing keeps in France, a 15th century, 3-storey high, round tower and a 15th century gate tower.

At present Largoët Castle can be visited for a fee. When I visited the round tower was closed but the keep was freely accessible. It is a marvellous building with walls of up to 9 meters thick and spiral staircases in the thickness of the walls. I loved the atmosphere created by the green moss on the stone walls. A visit is recommended!


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://castles.nl/largoet-castle#sigFreeId347860b239

Largoët Castle

Largoët Castle, locally known as Forteresse de Largoët or Tours d'Elven, lies in a wood west of the village of Elven, in the Morbihan department in France.

A castle at this site was first mentioned in 1020 as a possession of Derrien I, Lord of Elven.

In 1237 Largoët Castle went to the Malestroit family by marriage. During the War of the Breton Succession, in the mid-14th century, the castle was disputed by the House of Blois and the House of Montfort.

In 1463 it came into possession of the Rieux family. Between 1474 and 1476 Jean IV de Rieux harbored Henry Tudor, the future Henry VII of England, in the castle. It is said Henry stayed in a room in the keep. In 1490 the castle was dismantled by Charles VIII of France when his army invaded the Duchy of Brittany to force Anne of Brittany to marry him. She did but later had the castle restored.

In 1656 the castle was bought by Nicolas Fouquet, who was Superintendant of Finances of France under King Louis XIV. After Fouquet's death, his widow sold it to Michel de Trémeurec, an adviser to the Parliament of Brittany. The castle was never sold again but passed through several families by marriage.

In the 19th century, it was proposed to demolish Largoët Castle, given its dilapidation, but it was saved thanks to Prosper Mérimée, a French writer, who had it classed as a monument in 1862.

The present ruins are from a castle built between the 13th and 15th century. These ruins now mainly consist of a 14th century octagonal keep of 45 meters high, making it one of the highest existing keeps in France, a 15th century, 3-storey high, round tower and a 15th century gate tower.

At present Largoët Castle can be visited for a fee. When I visited the round tower was closed but the keep was freely accessible. It is a marvellous building with walls of up to 9 meters thick and spiral staircases in the thickness of the walls. I loved the atmosphere created by the green moss on the stone walls. A visit is recommended!


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://castles.nl/largoet-castle#sigFreeId347860b239