Jouy Tower

Jouy Tower, locally known as Donjon de Jouy, lies of the hamlet of the same name, in the Cher department in France.

The site of Jouy Tower was probably first used by the Romans for an army camp as the location was directly next to an important Roman road. On the remains of this Roman camp a fortified monastery was built in the 7th century, which was destroyed by invading Hungarians during the 8th or 9th century.

The present castle was built in 1191 by Peter II of Courtenay, Count of Nevers and cousin of Philip II of France by marriage. It was built as an, originally 27 meters high, keep with round corner towers. Until the 14th century it was a possession of the Counts of Sancerre, as was nearby Sagonne Castle.

Between 1356 and 1373, during the Hundred Years' War, the region was ravaged by the troops of Edward the Black Prince, the son of king Edward III of England. Apparently Jouy Tower was held by them for some time around 1361. In 1373 the English were driven out of the region by a joint expedition of the lords of Sagonne and Grossouvre and the Breton knight and French military commander, Bertrand du Guesclin.

After the departure of the English Jouy Tower was acquired by the House of Giac. They extensively modified it and turned it into a stately residence. In 1428 all their assets were seized and  turned over Louis I de Bourbon, Count of Montpensier. During the next 150 years the castle passed through the hands of several families through inheritance. In the 2nd part of the 16th century the French Wars of Religion broke out and Jouy was taken in 1591 by the troops of the Catholic League. They probably dismantled the castle and burned it down.

From then on the ruined castle was part of the County of Sagonne. The counts owned it until the French Revolution at the end of the 18th century when all their property was confiscated and declared Bien Nationaux and subsequently sold. The remains of Jouy Tower were then used by its owners as a quarry for building materials.

At present Jouy Tower is privately owned and during summertime the garden around the keep is used to exhibit contemporary art. A beautiful ruin.


Gallery

Jouy Tower

Jouy Tower, locally known as Donjon de Jouy, lies of the hamlet of the same name, in the Cher department in France.

The site of Jouy Tower was probably first used by the Romans for an army camp as the location was directly next to an important Roman road. On the remains of this Roman camp a fortified monastery was built in the 7th century, which was destroyed by invading Hungarians during the 8th or 9th century.

The present castle was built in 1191 by Peter II of Courtenay, Count of Nevers and cousin of Philip II of France by marriage. It was built as an, originally 27 meters high, keep with round corner towers. Until the 14th century it was a possession of the Counts of Sancerre, as was nearby Sagonne Castle.

Between 1356 and 1373, during the Hundred Years' War, the region was ravaged by the troops of Edward the Black Prince, the son of king Edward III of England. Apparently Jouy Tower was held by them for some time around 1361. In 1373 the English were driven out of the region by a joint expedition of the lords of Sagonne and Grossouvre and the Breton knight and French military commander, Bertrand du Guesclin.

After the departure of the English Jouy Tower was acquired by the House of Giac. They extensively modified it and turned it into a stately residence. In 1428 all their assets were seized and  turned over Louis I de Bourbon, Count of Montpensier. During the next 150 years the castle passed through the hands of several families through inheritance. In the 2nd part of the 16th century the French Wars of Religion broke out and Jouy was taken in 1591 by the troops of the Catholic League. They probably dismantled the castle and burned it down.

From then on the ruined castle was part of the County of Sagonne. The counts owned it until the French Revolution at the end of the 18th century when all their property was confiscated and declared Bien Nationaux and subsequently sold. The remains of Jouy Tower were then used by its owners as a quarry for building materials.

At present Jouy Tower is privately owned and during summertime the garden around the keep is used to exhibit contemporary art. A beautiful ruin.


Gallery