Joan of Arc Tower

Joan of Arc Tower, locally known as Tour Jeanne d'Arc, lies south west of the village of Beaurevoir, in the Aisne department in France.

Joan of Arc Tower, situated on a motte, is the only remnant of the keep of the castle of Beaurevoir. A castle here was first mentioned in the second part of the 12th century.

The Beaurevoir Castle of which the present tower is a remnant was built in the beginning of the 14th century according to the principles of military Philippine and English architecture. The keep slightly resembles the keep at Gaillard Castle and would have been connected to the curtain walls. It was then owned by the Counts of Luxembourg-Ligny.

In 1430 the fief and castle of Beaurevoir were owned by John II of Luxembourg, Count of Ligny. He joined Philip III, Duke of Burgundy, in the Siege of Compi├Ęgne and managed to capture Joan of Arc who he then imprisoned in the keep of Beaurevoir Castle, before selling her to the English. Hence the present name of the tower.

In 1674 Beaurevoir Castle was dismantled on the orders of Louis XIV of France and remained a ruin. The ruin was owned by the Marquess of Nesle during the 18th century. It passed to a private individual after the French Revolution who demolished all of the ruin with exception of the ruined keep, probably because of its connection to Joan of Arc.

Joan of Arc Tower can freely be visited, only its interior is not accessible. A curious tower.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://castles.nl/joan2-tower#sigFreeId33b09d387d

Joan of Arc Tower

Joan of Arc Tower, locally known as Tour Jeanne d'Arc, lies south west of the village of Beaurevoir, in the Aisne department in France.

Joan of Arc Tower, situated on a motte, is the only remnant of the keep of the castle of Beaurevoir. A castle here was first mentioned in the second part of the 12th century.

The Beaurevoir Castle of which the present tower is a remnant was built in the beginning of the 14th century according to the principles of military Philippine and English architecture. The keep slightly resembles the keep at Gaillard Castle and would have been connected to the curtain walls. It was then owned by the Counts of Luxembourg-Ligny.

In 1430 the fief and castle of Beaurevoir were owned by John II of Luxembourg, Count of Ligny. He joined Philip III, Duke of Burgundy, in the Siege of Compi├Ęgne and managed to capture Joan of Arc who he then imprisoned in the keep of Beaurevoir Castle, before selling her to the English. Hence the present name of the tower.

In 1674 Beaurevoir Castle was dismantled on the orders of Louis XIV of France and remained a ruin. The ruin was owned by the Marquess of Nesle during the 18th century. It passed to a private individual after the French Revolution who demolished all of the ruin with exception of the ruined keep, probably because of its connection to Joan of Arc.

Joan of Arc Tower can freely be visited, only its interior is not accessible. A curious tower.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://castles.nl/joan2-tower#sigFreeId33b09d387d