Hunaudaye Castle

Hunaudaye Castle, locally known as Château de la Hunaudaye, lies south west of the village of Pléven, in the Côtes-d'Armor department in France.

Hunaudaye Castle dates back to 1220 when it was founded by an Olivier Tournemine. He built the castle to monitor the nearby Arguenon river, which was at that time a border river between two lands. It was situated on or near the site of a 4th-century Gallo-Roman military camp.

The castle was first attacked during the War of the Breton Succession in the mid-14th century. The Tournemine family had chosen the side of the Penthièvre family, who were allies of the Counts of Blois. This caused their castle to be attacked by the Montforts of Brittany, allied by the English. The castle did not hold and was destroyed.

Between 1367 and 1474 Hunaudaye Castle was rebuilt by the Tournemine family. It was built as a castle with an irregular pentagonal plan, 5 round towers connected by curtain walls, a drawbridge and a surrounding moat. It lacked a keep.

The Tournemine family stayed owners of the castle until the end of the 16th century when they died out. After that the castle was gradually abandoned. In 1783 it was sold to Marquis de Talhouet.

In 1793, during the French Revolution, the area was threatened by marauding Chouans (counter-revolutionaries). To prevent these Chouans from setting up base in Hunaudaye Castle, the castle was burned and dismantled. From then on, up until the beginning of the 20th century, the castle ruin was used as a stone quarry.

During the 20th century and early 21th century the castle underwent several restorations campaigns; some parts were rebuilt and the moat was dug out again.

At present Hunaudaye Castle can be visited for a fee. A great castle ruin.


Gallery

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Hunaudaye Castle

Hunaudaye Castle, locally known as Château de la Hunaudaye, lies south west of the village of Pléven, in the Côtes-d'Armor department in France.

Hunaudaye Castle dates back to 1220 when it was founded by an Olivier Tournemine. He built the castle to monitor the nearby Arguenon river, which was at that time a border river between two lands. It was situated on or near the site of a 4th-century Gallo-Roman military camp.

The castle was first attacked during the War of the Breton Succession in the mid-14th century. The Tournemine family had chosen the side of the Penthièvre family, who were allies of the Counts of Blois. This caused their castle to be attacked by the Montforts of Brittany, allied by the English. The castle did not hold and was destroyed.

Between 1367 and 1474 Hunaudaye Castle was rebuilt by the Tournemine family. It was built as a castle with an irregular pentagonal plan, 5 round towers connected by curtain walls, a drawbridge and a surrounding moat. It lacked a keep.

The Tournemine family stayed owners of the castle until the end of the 16th century when they died out. After that the castle was gradually abandoned. In 1783 it was sold to Marquis de Talhouet.

In 1793, during the French Revolution, the area was threatened by marauding Chouans (counter-revolutionaries). To prevent these Chouans from setting up base in Hunaudaye Castle, the castle was burned and dismantled. From then on, up until the beginning of the 20th century, the castle ruin was used as a stone quarry.

During the 20th century and early 21th century the castle underwent several restorations campaigns; some parts were rebuilt and the moat was dug out again.

At present Hunaudaye Castle can be visited for a fee. A great castle ruin.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://castles.nl/hunaudaye-castle#sigFreeId8af101555c