Harry Avery's Castle

Harry Avery's Castle lies in a field, south west of the town of Newtownstewart, in County Tyrone, in Northern Ireland.

Harry Avery's Castle is thought to have been built around 1320 by a local chieftain of the O’Neill clan. The castle is named after Harry Avery (Henry Aimbreidh O’Neill) a local chief who died in 1392.

The castle consisted of a two-storey rectangular construction fronted by the remaining massive D-shaped twin towers (resembling a gatehouse) projecting from the south face of an artificially scarped knoll, whose sides have been revetted by a wall to form a polygonal enclosure. This two-storey tower building would have functioned as a tower house and there would have been several wooden structures inside the enclosure.

The castle was captured by the English in 1609. Subsequently, it was used as a quarry for building material.

Harry Avery's Castle is freely accessible provided that you leave the grazing livestock alone. Although there isn't very much left of this castle I like it a lot, especially its deserted location with great views of the surrounding countryside and the valley of the River Derg. Newtownstewart Castle is close by.


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Harry Avery's Castle

Harry Avery's Castle lies in a field, south west of the town of Newtownstewart, in County Tyrone, in Northern Ireland.

Harry Avery's Castle is thought to have been built around 1320 by a local chieftain of the O’Neill clan. The castle is named after Harry Avery (Henry Aimbreidh O’Neill) a local chief who died in 1392.

The castle consisted of a two-storey rectangular construction fronted by the remaining massive D-shaped twin towers (resembling a gatehouse) projecting from the south face of an artificially scarped knoll, whose sides have been revetted by a wall to form a polygonal enclosure. This two-storey tower building would have functioned as a tower house and there would have been several wooden structures inside the enclosure.

The castle was captured by the English in 1609. Subsequently, it was used as a quarry for building material.

Harry Avery's Castle is freely accessible provided that you leave the grazing livestock alone. Although there isn't very much left of this castle I like it a lot, especially its deserted location with great views of the surrounding countryside and the valley of the River Derg. Newtownstewart Castle is close by.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://castles.nl/harry-avery-castle#sigFreeId503281a597