Hainburg Castle

Hainburg Castle, locally known as Hainburg, Heimenburg or Heimoburg, lies on a mountain in the town of Hainburg an der Donau, in the province of Lower Austria in Austria.

In 1050 Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor, ordered the building of a new castle at this site, probably restoring an earlier fortification. The building works were accompanied with several attempts of Hungarian troops to prevent its completion.

In 1192, Leopold V, Duke of Austria, ordered the expansion of Hainburg Castle. After he died 2 years later these works were carried on by his successors. This was paid for using part of the ransom Leopold had received for Richard the Lionheart.

For the main part of the 13th century the castle was a residence of the royal Babenberg family. In 1252 the marriage of Ottokar II of Bohemia and Margaret of Austria took place in the castle chapel. The Habsburg family took the castle in 1278.

Between 1477 and 1482 it was besieged unsuccessfully several times by the Hungarian king Matthias Corvinus and his Black Army. In September 1482, after a 5-month siege, he was finally able to take it. His forces occupied the castle until 1490, when they were expelled by the troops of Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor, after Matthias had died.

In 1514 Hainburg Castle was awarded to the Von Zelking family. Due to the fear of Turkish invasions they strengthened it and adapted it to the use of firearms. This didn't prevent it to fall into the hands of the Ottoman Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent in 1529 on his way to the Siege of Vienna.

In 1547 the Von Zelkingers leased the castle out. From then on it would never be used as a residence anymore. Again it was rebuilt and strengthened. A lightning strike to a powder depot caused an explosion which destroyed part of the castle in 1569.

By 1672 the Palas of the castle was in ruin. The defenses of the castle, however, were still strong and considered impressive. Even still it was taken and destroyed in 1683 by Ottoman troops under the Grand Vizier Kara Mustafa Pasha on his way to the Battle of Vienna. It never regained its military importance.

Later, during the 18th century, it was abandoned and left to fall to ruin. In the 20th century consolidation works were carried out.

At present Hainburg Castle can freely be visited. A nice castle ruin, giving great views over the medieval town below and the surrounding countryside. Röthelstein Castle is nearby.


Gallery

Hainburg Castle

Hainburg Castle, locally known as Hainburg, Heimenburg or Heimoburg, lies on a mountain in the town of Hainburg an der Donau, in the province of Lower Austria in Austria.

In 1050 Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor, ordered the building of a new castle at this site, probably restoring an earlier fortification. The building works were accompanied with several attempts of Hungarian troops to prevent its completion.

In 1192, Leopold V, Duke of Austria, ordered the expansion of Hainburg Castle. After he died 2 years later these works were carried on by his successors. This was paid for using part of the ransom Leopold had received for Richard the Lionheart.

For the main part of the 13th century the castle was a residence of the royal Babenberg family. In 1252 the marriage of Ottokar II of Bohemia and Margaret of Austria took place in the castle chapel. The Habsburg family took the castle in 1278.

Between 1477 and 1482 it was besieged unsuccessfully several times by the Hungarian king Matthias Corvinus and his Black Army. In September 1482, after a 5-month siege, he was finally able to take it. His forces occupied the castle until 1490, when they were expelled by the troops of Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor, after Matthias had died.

In 1514 Hainburg Castle was awarded to the Von Zelking family. Due to the fear of Turkish invasions they strengthened it and adapted it to the use of firearms. This didn't prevent it to fall into the hands of the Ottoman Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent in 1529 on his way to the Siege of Vienna.

In 1547 the Von Zelkingers leased the castle out. From then on it would never be used as a residence anymore. Again it was rebuilt and strengthened. A lightning strike to a powder depot caused an explosion which destroyed part of the castle in 1569.

By 1672 the Palas of the castle was in ruin. The defenses of the castle, however, were still strong and considered impressive. Even still it was taken and destroyed in 1683 by Ottoman troops under the Grand Vizier Kara Mustafa Pasha on his way to the Battle of Vienna. It never regained its military importance.

Later, during the 18th century, it was abandoned and left to fall to ruin. In the 20th century consolidation works were carried out.

At present Hainburg Castle can freely be visited. A nice castle ruin, giving great views over the medieval town below and the surrounding countryside. Röthelstein Castle is nearby.


Gallery