Guingamp Castle

Guingamp Castle, locally known as Château de Guingamp or more commonly as Château de Pierre II, lies in the town of the same name, in the Côtes-d'Armor department in France.

The first fortification at this site was a motte castle built somewhere during the 11th century by the House of Penthièvre, Counts of Guingamp. This mound, 30 meters in diameter, was razed in the 12th century by order of the royal House of Plantagenet after they regained the Duchy of Brittany.

Between the 12th and the 14th century a new polygonal enclosure was built here. That castle lasted until 1420 when John V, Duke of Brittany, ordered its destruction. His son Peter received the title Count of Guingamp from him. It was Peter, who would later become Duke of Brittany as Peter II, who, in the first part of the 15th century, ordered the construction of the castle of which we see the remains today. Hence its present name. In the mid-15th century the castle formed an integral part of the city ramparts. Peter's castle was built as an artillery fortress with a square groundplan of 36 by 36 meters and with 4 circular corner towers.

In 1489 the castle and town were besieged by the troops of Charles VIII of France, led by the Viscount of Rohan. They suffered another siege in 1591, during the French Wars of Religion.

In 1626 César, Duke of Vendôme and half-brother of Louis XIII of France, was Lord of Guingamp. As he was implicated in the Chalais Conspiracy against Cardinal Richelieu, he was arrested and imprisoned in Vincennes Castle in Paris. Guingamp Castle was then also dismantled on Louis' order. César spent 4 years in Vincennes before he was released and exiled.

During the 19th century the site of the dismantled castle was built over, with the new building serving as a girl's school by nuns. At the end of the 20th century the school moved out and after the buildings were cleared archaeological excavations followed in 2005. In recent years the castle's remains were consolidated and upgraded to a little town park.

At present the remains of Guingamp Castle are freely accessible during daytime. A nice castle remnant.


Gallery

Guingamp Castle

Guingamp Castle, locally known as Château de Guingamp or more commonly as Château de Pierre II, lies in the town of the same name, in the Côtes-d'Armor department in France.

The first fortification at this site was a motte castle built somewhere during the 11th century by the House of Penthièvre, Counts of Guingamp. This mound, 30 meters in diameter, was razed in the 12th century by order of the royal House of Plantagenet after they regained the Duchy of Brittany.

Between the 12th and the 14th century a new polygonal enclosure was built here. That castle lasted until 1420 when John V, Duke of Brittany, ordered its destruction. His son Peter received the title Count of Guingamp from him. It was Peter, who would later become Duke of Brittany as Peter II, who, in the first part of the 15th century, ordered the construction of the castle of which we see the remains today. Hence its present name. In the mid-15th century the castle formed an integral part of the city ramparts. Peter's castle was built as an artillery fortress with a square groundplan of 36 by 36 meters and with 4 circular corner towers.

In 1489 the castle and town were besieged by the troops of Charles VIII of France, led by the Viscount of Rohan. They suffered another siege in 1591, during the French Wars of Religion.

In 1626 César, Duke of Vendôme and half-brother of Louis XIII of France, was Lord of Guingamp. As he was implicated in the Chalais Conspiracy against Cardinal Richelieu, he was arrested and imprisoned in Vincennes Castle in Paris. Guingamp Castle was then also dismantled on Louis' order. César spent 4 years in Vincennes before he was released and exiled.

During the 19th century the site of the dismantled castle was built over, with the new building serving as a girl's school by nuns. At the end of the 20th century the school moved out and after the buildings were cleared archaeological excavations followed in 2005. In recent years the castle's remains were consolidated and upgraded to a little town park.

At present the remains of Guingamp Castle are freely accessible during daytime. A nice castle remnant.


Gallery