Gaillon Castle

Gaillon Castle, locally known as Château de Gaillon, lies in the town of the same name, in the Eure department in France.

The first castle at this site dates back to the 12th century. Due to an agreement it passed from English to French hands, under Philip II of France. In 1194 it returned into the hands of John, King of England. Only to finally fall into French hands after a treaty in 1196. Then it was given to a Lambert Cadoc by Philip II. In 1220 Lambert falls out of favor with Philip and he is jailed after the castle was taken by force.

In 1262 Gaillon Castle was obtained by Eudes Rigaud, the archbishop of Rouen, from Louis IX of France. The castle then became the perpetual property of the archbishops and their summer residence.

In 1424, during the Hundred Years' War, after the English had won the Battle of Verneuil, the castle is demolished on the orders of John of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Bedford.

From the mid-15th century on a new castle-palace was built by subsequent archbishops. Building continued until the early 16th century. When finished it was the first castle-palace built in the style of the French Renaissance in France.

The last archbishop residing in Gaillon Castle left at the end of the 18th century due to the French Revolution. In 1793 the castle was looted and confiscated.

Between 1812 and 1816 the castle was turned into a state prison. It quickly became one of the largest detention centers in France, having among its prisoners also a lot of children. Only from 1868 on are they separated from the adult prisoners. In 1876 a ward for mentally ill prisoners was added to the prison, the first in France. In 1904 the prison was closed.

Between 1903 and 1918 the castle was used as a center for military training. In 1925 Gaillon Castle is auctioned off by the State, only to be bought back in 1970. After that it was restored.

When I visited the castle it was closed. But later online I read that it can be visited for a fee. A nice chateau, I especially like the gate tower.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://castles.nl/gaillon-castle#sigFreeIdf5fcf94594

Gaillon Castle

Gaillon Castle, locally known as Château de Gaillon, lies in the town of the same name, in the Eure department in France.

The first castle at this site dates back to the 12th century. Due to an agreement it passed from English to French hands, under Philip II of France. In 1194 it returned into the hands of John, King of England. Only to finally fall into French hands after a treaty in 1196. Then it was given to a Lambert Cadoc by Philip II. In 1220 Lambert falls out of favor with Philip and he is jailed after the castle was taken by force.

In 1262 Gaillon Castle was obtained by Eudes Rigaud, the archbishop of Rouen, from Louis IX of France. The castle then became the perpetual property of the archbishops and their summer residence.

In 1424, during the Hundred Years' War, after the English had won the Battle of Verneuil, the castle is demolished on the orders of John of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Bedford.

From the mid-15th century on a new castle-palace was built by subsequent archbishops. Building continued until the early 16th century. When finished it was the first castle-palace built in the style of the French Renaissance in France.

The last archbishop residing in Gaillon Castle left at the end of the 18th century due to the French Revolution. In 1793 the castle was looted and confiscated.

Between 1812 and 1816 the castle was turned into a state prison. It quickly became one of the largest detention centers in France, having among its prisoners also a lot of children. Only from 1868 on are they separated from the adult prisoners. In 1876 a ward for mentally ill prisoners was added to the prison, the first in France. In 1904 the prison was closed.

Between 1903 and 1918 the castle was used as a center for military training. In 1925 Gaillon Castle is auctioned off by the State, only to be bought back in 1970. After that it was restored.

When I visited the castle it was closed. But later online I read that it can be visited for a fee. A nice chateau, I especially like the gate tower.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://castles.nl/gaillon-castle#sigFreeIdf5fcf94594