Freudenkoppe Castle

Freudenkoppe Castle, locally known as Burg Freudenkoppe, lies on a hill in the forests west of the village of Neroth, in the Rhineland-Palatinate region in Germany.

Freudenkoppe Castle was probably built between 1337, when it was first mentioned, and 1340, when it was finished by John I of Bohemia. In 1346 it was given to Baldwin of Luxembourg, Archbishop-Elector of Trier, by the son of John I. Baldwin used the castle as base for his siege of Daun Castle.

In 1440 a tower house was built just outside of the castle's walls. The castle is last mentioned in 1460. So it either fell into ruin from then on or it was destroyed by French troops of Louis XIV in 1689.

The castle was actually built on the top of a basaltic cinder cone of an extinct volcano, called the Nerother Kopf. So even before the castle was built, the site was used to quarry mill stones. This created several artificial caves underneath the castle's walls. The largest cave is named the Mühlsteinhöhle (Millstone Cave). Quarrying went on until 1788.

Freudenkoppe Castle had a trapezoidal plan with a square keep and was encompassed by a dry moat on three sides.

At present Freudenkoppe Castle is freely accessible. When going for a visit be advised that from the end of the nearest forest road you will have to walk for a good 15 minutes over steep terrain to reach the castle ruin. A very nice omninous ruin, especially in combination with the cave.


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Freudenkoppe Castle

Freudenkoppe Castle, locally known as Burg Freudenkoppe, lies on a hill in the forests west of the village of Neroth, in the Rhineland-Palatinate region in Germany.

Freudenkoppe Castle was probably built between 1337, when it was first mentioned, and 1340, when it was finished by John I of Bohemia. In 1346 it was given to Baldwin of Luxembourg, Archbishop-Elector of Trier, by the son of John I. Baldwin used the castle as base for his siege of Daun Castle.

In 1440 a tower house was built just outside of the castle's walls. The castle is last mentioned in 1460. So it either fell into ruin from then on or it was destroyed by French troops of Louis XIV in 1689.

The castle was actually built on the top of a basaltic cinder cone of an extinct volcano, called the Nerother Kopf. So even before the castle was built, the site was used to quarry mill stones. This created several artificial caves underneath the castle's walls. The largest cave is named the Mühlsteinhöhle (Millstone Cave). Quarrying went on until 1788.

Freudenkoppe Castle had a trapezoidal plan with a square keep and was encompassed by a dry moat on three sides.

At present Freudenkoppe Castle is freely accessible. When going for a visit be advised that from the end of the nearest forest road you will have to walk for a good 15 minutes over steep terrain to reach the castle ruin. A very nice omninous ruin, especially in combination with the cave.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://castles.nl/freudenkoppe-castle#sigFreeId801cdf0451