Fort la Latte

Fort la Latte, locally also known as Château de la Roche Goyon, lies on a rocky headland east of the town of the Plévenon, in the Côtes-d'Armor department in France.

Roche Goyon Castle was built between 1340 and 1370 by Étienne III Gouyon, Lord of Matignon. In 1379 the castle was succesfully besieged by French troops under Bertrand du Guesclin, a Breton knight who would later become Constable of France. The castle was then confiscated for Charles V of France, who restored the Gouyon family as owners after a treaty in 1381.

In 1490 the castle was fruitlessly besieged by English troops.

During the French Wars of Religion, in the second half of the 16th century, Jacques II de Goyon, Lord of Matignon, had taken the side of Henry IV of France. This led to a siege of his castle, Fort la Latte as it was known by that time, by Catholic League troops. They took the castle, burned and dismantled it, after which it was abandoned.

In the beginning of the 18th century, under Louis XIV of France, the ruined castle was rebuilt and regained its military importance when it was bastioned.

During the Hundred Days, in 1815, Fort la Latte was besieged for the last time, but without succes.

After the First French Empire, in the 19th century, the castle became obsolete as it could not be adapted to the evolution of military techniques. So, in 1892, it was sold to a private owner. After several other private owners it was acquired by Frédéric Joüon des Longrais, a French historian, who started extensive restoration works which lasted till the 1950's.

At present Fort la Latte can be visited for a fee. This is a great castle with a unique keep on a beautiful location. But as it is a well-known tourist destination it can be very crowded with visitors sometimes.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://castles.nl/fort-latte#sigFreeId4348631a37

Fort la Latte

Fort la Latte, locally also known as Château de la Roche Goyon, lies on a rocky headland east of the town of the Plévenon, in the Côtes-d'Armor department in France.

Roche Goyon Castle was built between 1340 and 1370 by Étienne III Gouyon, Lord of Matignon. In 1379 the castle was succesfully besieged by French troops under Bertrand du Guesclin, a Breton knight who would later become Constable of France. The castle was then confiscated for Charles V of France, who restored the Gouyon family as owners after a treaty in 1381.

In 1490 the castle was fruitlessly besieged by English troops.

During the French Wars of Religion, in the second half of the 16th century, Jacques II de Goyon, Lord of Matignon, had taken the side of Henry IV of France. This led to a siege of his castle, Fort la Latte as it was known by that time, by Catholic League troops. They took the castle, burned and dismantled it, after which it was abandoned.

In the beginning of the 18th century, under Louis XIV of France, the ruined castle was rebuilt and regained its military importance when it was bastioned.

During the Hundred Days, in 1815, Fort la Latte was besieged for the last time, but without succes.

After the First French Empire, in the 19th century, the castle became obsolete as it could not be adapted to the evolution of military techniques. So, in 1892, it was sold to a private owner. After several other private owners it was acquired by Frédéric Joüon des Longrais, a French historian, who started extensive restoration works which lasted till the 1950's.

At present Fort la Latte can be visited for a fee. This is a great castle with a unique keep on a beautiful location. But as it is a well-known tourist destination it can be very crowded with visitors sometimes.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://castles.nl/fort-latte#sigFreeId4348631a37