Folleville Castle

Folleville Castle, locally known as Château de Folleville or Château des Gondis, lies in the village with the same name, south of the city of Amiens in the Somme department in the Picardy region in France.

Folleville Castle was built in the late 14th century, dominating the valley of the Noye river, by Jean II de Folleville probably on the site of an earlier castle destroyed in 1358. Archeological excavations gave evidence of a Roman camp at this site.

During the Hundred Years War, Folleville Castle was sieged several times. In 1440 it succumbed to the artillery of the famous English captain Talbot. It was taken and partially dismantled by the Burgundians to end incursions in the region by the English. It was not until 1478 that work was undertaken to repair the castle. A wing, now lost, was then added.

Later is was owned by the Des Lannoy family.

In the 17th century Folleville Castle was owned by the Des Gondis family. Confessor and spiritual director to Mme de Gondi was Saint Vincent de Paul who started his mission in the village church.

In 1777 the stones of Folleville Castle were used to built another castle in Mailly-Raineval by the Count de Mailly, husband of Marie Michèle de Séricourt. Twenty years later, during the French Revolution, this new castle was damaged and again stones were taken from Folleville Castle for repairs.

Folleville Castle can be visited. The church next to the castle is a Unesco World Heritage site. This is a charming castle ruin in a small, quiet rural village.


Gallery

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Folleville Castle

Folleville Castle, locally known as Château de Folleville or Château des Gondis, lies in the village with the same name, south of the city of Amiens in the Somme department in the Picardy region in France.

Folleville Castle was built in the late 14th century, dominating the valley of the Noye river, by Jean II de Folleville probably on the site of an earlier castle destroyed in 1358. Archeological excavations gave evidence of a Roman camp at this site.

During the Hundred Years War, Folleville Castle was sieged several times. In 1440 it succumbed to the artillery of the famous English captain Talbot. It was taken and partially dismantled by the Burgundians to end incursions in the region by the English. It was not until 1478 that work was undertaken to repair the castle. A wing, now lost, was then added.

Later is was owned by the Des Lannoy family.

In the 17th century Folleville Castle was owned by the Des Gondis family. Confessor and spiritual director to Mme de Gondi was Saint Vincent de Paul who started his mission in the village church.

In 1777 the stones of Folleville Castle were used to built another castle in Mailly-Raineval by the Count de Mailly, husband of Marie Michèle de Séricourt. Twenty years later, during the French Revolution, this new castle was damaged and again stones were taken from Folleville Castle for repairs.

Folleville Castle can be visited. The church next to the castle is a Unesco World Heritage site. This is a charming castle ruin in a small, quiet rural village.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://castles.nl/folleville-castle#sigFreeIdc8eb612e0f