Falkenstein Castle

Falkenstein Castle, locally known as Château du Falkenstein, lies north-east of the village of Lieschbach, in the Moselle department in France. This area is also known as the Northern Alsace or the Northern Vosges.

Falkenstein Castle was built somewhere before 1127, when it was first mentioned, by Count Peter of Lutzelbourg to protect his properties in the Holy Forest of Haguenau. After his descendants died without an heir in 1150 the castle became the shared possession of Folmar of Sarrewerden and the Hohenstaufen dynasty.

In 1205 a Falkenstein family appears. In 1335 a castle peace treaty was signed demarcating the castle in 3 parts by means of transverse walls. Until 1515 the Falkenstein family were partial owners of the castle, then they became the sole owners of the complete castle again. Balthasar of Falkenstein then started to modernize the castle, a work that was continued by his sons.

In 1564 Philipp IV, Count of Hanau-Lichtenberg, bought Falkenstein Castle. Only a few months after his acquisition the castle was destroyed by a fire. It was never rebuilt. In 1570, a part of the ruined castle was still inhabited by a forester employed by the Count of Hanau-Lichtenberg. In 1623, during the Thirty Years' War, the ruined castle and the foresters residence were damaged by German troops led by Ernst von Mansfeld, finally ending all habitation at the castle. What remained of the castle was finally destroyed in 1676/1677 by French troops led by Joseph de Montclar.

Falkenstein Castle is situated on a rocky spur with rooms and stairs carved out of the sandstone rock. The largest remaining part is the 16th century water tower flanking the western side of the spur.

Since consolidation works ended in 2013 Falkenstein Castle is freely accessible. A great castle ruin.


Gallery

Falkenstein Castle

Falkenstein Castle, locally known as Château du Falkenstein, lies north-east of the village of Lieschbach, in the Moselle department in France. This area is also known as the Northern Alsace or the Northern Vosges.

Falkenstein Castle was built somewhere before 1127, when it was first mentioned, by Count Peter of Lutzelbourg to protect his properties in the Holy Forest of Haguenau. After his descendants died without an heir in 1150 the castle became the shared possession of Folmar of Sarrewerden and the Hohenstaufen dynasty.

In 1205 a Falkenstein family appears. In 1335 a castle peace treaty was signed demarcating the castle in 3 parts by means of transverse walls. Until 1515 the Falkenstein family were partial owners of the castle, then they became the sole owners of the complete castle again. Balthasar of Falkenstein then started to modernize the castle, a work that was continued by his sons.

In 1564 Philipp IV, Count of Hanau-Lichtenberg, bought Falkenstein Castle. Only a few months after his acquisition the castle was destroyed by a fire. It was never rebuilt. In 1570, a part of the ruined castle was still inhabited by a forester employed by the Count of Hanau-Lichtenberg. In 1623, during the Thirty Years' War, the ruined castle and the foresters residence were damaged by German troops led by Ernst von Mansfeld, finally ending all habitation at the castle. What remained of the castle was finally destroyed in 1676/1677 by French troops led by Joseph de Montclar.

Falkenstein Castle is situated on a rocky spur with rooms and stairs carved out of the sandstone rock. The largest remaining part is the 16th century water tower flanking the western side of the spur.

Since consolidation works ended in 2013 Falkenstein Castle is freely accessible. A great castle ruin.


Gallery