Eisenberg Castle

Eisenberg Castle, locally known as Burgruine Eisenberg, lies north of the town of Pfronten, in the Bavaria region in Germany.

Eisenberg Castle, a hilltop castle, was first mentioned in 1340 but was probably built around 1315 by the Lords of Hohenegg. In 1382 the Hohenegg lords had to pass the castle to the Austrian Duke Leopold III von Habsburg, who soon gave the castle and the rulership as a fief to Friedrich von Freyberg, the son-in-law of the last noble lord of the castle, Berthold von Hohenegg.

In 1525, during the German Peasants' War, the castle was damaged, for which the Hohenegg's were compensated 10 years later.

In 1646, at the end of the Thirty Years' War, the Protestant Swedish army was on its way to the region. To prevent it from falling into their hands intact, the Tyrolean government decided to abandon the castle. It was then cleared out and set on fire, reducing it to a ruin. The same was done with its neighbour Hohenfreyberg and the nearby Falkenstein Castle. However, shortly after the destruction the Swedish army changed its course and never reached the area, making the destruction meaningless. 

At present Eisenberg Castle can freely be visited. A very nice ruin and together with its neighbour Hohenfreyberg, 200 m to the west, certainly very much worth your visit.


Gallery

Eisenberg Castle

Eisenberg Castle, locally known as Burgruine Eisenberg, lies north of the town of Pfronten, in the Bavaria region in Germany.

Eisenberg Castle, a hilltop castle, was first mentioned in 1340 but was probably built around 1315 by the Lords of Hohenegg. In 1382 the Hohenegg lords had to pass the castle to the Austrian Duke Leopold III von Habsburg, who soon gave the castle and the rulership as a fief to Friedrich von Freyberg, the son-in-law of the last noble lord of the castle, Berthold von Hohenegg.

In 1525, during the German Peasants' War, the castle was damaged, for which the Hohenegg's were compensated 10 years later.

In 1646, at the end of the Thirty Years' War, the Protestant Swedish army was on its way to the region. To prevent it from falling into their hands intact, the Tyrolean government decided to abandon the castle. It was then cleared out and set on fire, reducing it to a ruin. The same was done with its neighbour Hohenfreyberg and the nearby Falkenstein Castle. However, shortly after the destruction the Swedish army changed its course and never reached the area, making the destruction meaningless. 

At present Eisenberg Castle can freely be visited. A very nice ruin and together with its neighbour Hohenfreyberg, 200 m to the west, certainly very much worth your visit.


Gallery