Éclaibes Castle

Éclaibes Castle, locally known as Château d'Éclaibes, lies north of the village of the same name, in the Nord department in France.

Éclaibes Castle dates back to the 11th or 12th century when it was built by the Roussillon family who were Lords of Éclaibes. The castle was built upon a rocky outcrop and stones coming from digging out the moats were used in its construction. Originally it was a square castle flanked by round towers at its corners.

Two Lords of Éclaibes died during the Crusades and posthumously recieved the titles Knight of Jerusalem and Mount Sinai.

Jean III of Éclaibes was chamberlain to Charles V, the Holy Roman Emperor, and accompanied him during his Conquest of Tunis in 1535. Jean then seduced one of the daughters of the Bey of Tunis and took her back to Éclaibes Castle, which he then completely rebuilt for her in Turkish style. When Jean died without legitimate offspring in 1591 he was succeeded by his oldest bastard, Charles. After he died, only 10 years later, the castle and fief fell to Charles III de Croÿ, Prince of Chimay and Lord of Avesnes.

During the 15th century Louis XI of France stayed at Éclaibes Castle when he besieged the nearby towns of Maubeuge and Le Quesnoy.

Éclaibes Castle was besieged several times during the 17th century by Louis XIII of France and Louis XIV of France who coveted the still Spanish County of Hainaut. In 1678 it finally became French after the Treaty of Nijmegen.

Later Louis XIV stayed at the castle at the invitation of the Prince of Croÿ, who hoped that Louis would fortify the town of Éclaibes. It is said that Louis at first was favorable to the idea but changed his mind after he fell through a toilet chair that was too old so support him, after which Louis fortified Maubeuge instead.

In the 18th century the castle belonged to the Count of Boussu and later to the Duke of Orléans.

In 1810 Éclaibes Castle became property of the mayor of Éclaibes, ancestor of the current owners. In 1842 the castle still had towers and crenellated walls. At present only one round tower remains, called 'Tour de la Sorcière' or 'Tower of the Witch'. Also part of the moat and the overgrown walls of the outer castle are visible.

At present Éclaibes Castle is part of a private farm and can not be visited. Also it remains are very much overgrown. Too bad, I am curious to see what remains inside.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://castles.nl/eclaibes-castle#sigFreeId9e7b738c41

Éclaibes Castle

Éclaibes Castle, locally known as Château d'Éclaibes, lies north of the village of the same name, in the Nord department in France.

Éclaibes Castle dates back to the 11th or 12th century when it was built by the Roussillon family who were Lords of Éclaibes. The castle was built upon a rocky outcrop and stones coming from digging out the moats were used in its construction. Originally it was a square castle flanked by round towers at its corners.

Two Lords of Éclaibes died during the Crusades and posthumously recieved the titles Knight of Jerusalem and Mount Sinai.

Jean III of Éclaibes was chamberlain to Charles V, the Holy Roman Emperor, and accompanied him during his Conquest of Tunis in 1535. Jean then seduced one of the daughters of the Bey of Tunis and took her back to Éclaibes Castle, which he then completely rebuilt for her in Turkish style. When Jean died without legitimate offspring in 1591 he was succeeded by his oldest bastard, Charles. After he died, only 10 years later, the castle and fief fell to Charles III de Croÿ, Prince of Chimay and Lord of Avesnes.

During the 15th century Louis XI of France stayed at Éclaibes Castle when he besieged the nearby towns of Maubeuge and Le Quesnoy.

Éclaibes Castle was besieged several times during the 17th century by Louis XIII of France and Louis XIV of France who coveted the still Spanish County of Hainaut. In 1678 it finally became French after the Treaty of Nijmegen.

Later Louis XIV stayed at the castle at the invitation of the Prince of Croÿ, who hoped that Louis would fortify the town of Éclaibes. It is said that Louis at first was favorable to the idea but changed his mind after he fell through a toilet chair that was too old so support him, after which Louis fortified Maubeuge instead.

In the 18th century the castle belonged to the Count of Boussu and later to the Duke of Orléans.

In 1810 Éclaibes Castle became property of the mayor of Éclaibes, ancestor of the current owners. In 1842 the castle still had towers and crenellated walls. At present only one round tower remains, called 'Tour de la Sorcière' or 'Tower of the Witch'. Also part of the moat and the overgrown walls of the outer castle are visible.

At present Éclaibes Castle is part of a private farm and can not be visited. Also it remains are very much overgrown. Too bad, I am curious to see what remains inside.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://castles.nl/eclaibes-castle#sigFreeId9e7b738c41