Dinan Castle

Dinan Castle, locally known as Château de Dinan or Donjon de la duchesse Anne, lies in the town of the same name, in the Côtes-d'Armor department in France.

Dinan Castle is mainly a keep, standing on the corner of the medieval ramparts of the town of Dinan. It stands outside the walls and is only connected through a bridge.

In 1384 John IV, Duke of Brittany, ordered the construction of the keep to assert his authority over the town that had long supported his rival; Charles of Blois-Châtillon. Construction was completed in 1393. Although it had the austere appearance of a tower with a military purpose it was above all a princely residence.

At the end of the 16th century the town of Dinan became a stronghold for the French Catholic League. Then Philippe-Emmanuel of Lorraine, Duke of Mercœr and Governor of Brittany, had the tower modified. It was equipped with a forecourt. This was connected to the Coëtquen Tower, a 15th century artillery tower, by a curtain wall that also had machicolation directed to the town itself. Thus not only protecting it from an enemy on the outside but also from the townspeople.

In the 17th century the castle was abandoned but, because of its sturdy architecture, it was transformed into a prison in the beginning of the 18th century.

Since the beginning of the 20th century the castle serves as the local museum.

Dinan Castle can be visited for a fee but was closed when I came by, sadly enough. A mighty keep and I hope to visit it some day.


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Dinan Castle

Dinan Castle, locally known as Château de Dinan or Donjon de la duchesse Anne, lies in the town of the same name, in the Côtes-d'Armor department in France.

Dinan Castle is mainly a keep, standing on the corner of the medieval ramparts of the town of Dinan. It stands outside the walls and is only connected through a bridge.

In 1384 John IV, Duke of Brittany, ordered the construction of the keep to assert his authority over the town that had long supported his rival; Charles of Blois-Châtillon. Construction was completed in 1393. Although it had the austere appearance of a tower with a military purpose it was above all a princely residence.

At the end of the 16th century the town of Dinan became a stronghold for the French Catholic League. Then Philippe-Emmanuel of Lorraine, Duke of Mercœr and Governor of Brittany, had the tower modified. It was equipped with a forecourt. This was connected to the Coëtquen Tower, a 15th century artillery tower, by a curtain wall that also had machicolation directed to the town itself. Thus not only protecting it from an enemy on the outside but also from the townspeople.

In the 17th century the castle was abandoned but, because of its sturdy architecture, it was transformed into a prison in the beginning of the 18th century.

Since the beginning of the 20th century the castle serves as the local museum.

Dinan Castle can be visited for a fee but was closed when I came by, sadly enough. A mighty keep and I hope to visit it some day.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://castles.nl/dinan-castle#sigFreeIdd0486708e9