Conros Castle

Conros Castle, locally known as Château de Conros, lies east the village of Crespiat, in the Cantal department in France.

An earlier castle at this site, a height above a medieval bridge over the Cère river, was already mentioned in the early 12th century as Montal Castle. Later that century it passed to the Astorg I d'Orlhac (later modernized to Aurillac). The present castle was built a short time before 1230 by Astorg II d'Aurillac and was named Conros. The family kept the castle until 1443, when it passed to the Courcelle family through marriage.

Later Conros Castle passed through the hands of several families through marriages or sales. It was taken by surprise by Protestant troops, in 1570, during the absence of its then owner; Rigaud de Saint-Martial, and ravaged. Until the 17th century the castle was repeatedly altered. 

In 1777 it passed to the Humières family through marriage. It was the home of writer Robert d'Humières in the late 19th century until his death in Flanders, during WW I, in 1914. After that the castle stood abandoned for some decades and was being vandalized. It would have fallen to ruin if had not been acquired by Robert's granddaughter Maud and her husband Alain Mongon in 1971. They restored the castle back to its present state.

At present Conros Castle can be visited for a fee. Sadly enough it was closed due to corona measures when I came by. A nice castle.


Gallery

Conros Castle

Conros Castle, locally known as Château de Conros, lies east the village of Crespiat, in the Cantal department in France.

An earlier castle at this site, a height above a medieval bridge over the Cère river, was already mentioned in the early 12th century as Montal Castle. Later that century it passed to the Astorg I d'Orlhac (later modernized to Aurillac). The present castle was built a short time before 1230 by Astorg II d'Aurillac and was named Conros. The family kept the castle until 1443, when it passed to the Courcelle family through marriage.

Later Conros Castle passed through the hands of several families through marriages or sales. It was taken by surprise by Protestant troops, in 1570, during the absence of its then owner; Rigaud de Saint-Martial, and ravaged. Until the 17th century the castle was repeatedly altered. 

In 1777 it passed to the Humières family through marriage. It was the home of writer Robert d'Humières in the late 19th century until his death in Flanders, during WW I, in 1914. After that the castle stood abandoned for some decades and was being vandalized. It would have fallen to ruin if had not been acquired by Robert's granddaughter Maud and her husband Alain Mongon in 1971. They restored the castle back to its present state.

At present Conros Castle can be visited for a fee. Sadly enough it was closed due to corona measures when I came by. A nice castle.


Gallery